Does the Blood Type Diet Really Work?

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Food and Health, Issues

Is Eating Right For Your Blood Type A Sham?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

cb43e76f-6bf7-4e82-8fc1-95005d2c5626Does the Blood Type Diet really work? In 1997 Dr. Peter J. D’Adamo wrote a book about the blood type diet called “Eat Right 4 Your Type”. Dr. D’Adamo claims that people with different blood types process food differently, so their blood type determines the type of diet that is healthiest for them. Specifically, he claims that people with:

  • Blood group O are descended from hunters and should consume high protein diets.
  • Blood group A are descended from farmers and should consume a near vegetarian diet – completely avoiding red meats.
  • Blood group B are descended from nomads. They have the most flexible digestive system and can eat the widest variety of foods – even dairy products, which he does not recommend for any of the other blood types.
  • Blood group AB are an enigma and are somewhere between blood group A and blood group B.

It’s an interesting concept. Dietary recommendations are made for populations as a whole, and there is tremendous genetic variation in populations. Because of that genetic variation, there is no perfect diet for everyone. Every knowledgeable health expert will tell you that.

The question then becomes “How do you know what kind of diet is healthiest for you?”

The blood type diet is a very simple system. Your blood type is easy to determine. Once you know your blood type you know what to eat. There’s no guesswork.

Could it really be so simple? Over 7 million copies of Dr. D’Adamo’s book have been sold. Millions of people believe in this concept. So it is only fitting to ask “What is the evidence?”

An Objective Scientific Analysis of the Blood Type Diet

There is no doubt that blood type is related to some human genetic and physical traits, but the important question is whether blood type is related to the health outcomes of different diets – the central thesis of Dr. D’Adamo’s book. A Belgian group lead by Dr. Emmey De Buch did a systematic search of the scientific literature to answer that very question (L. Cusack et al, Am J. Clin. Nutr. , 98: 99-104, 2013).

They identified 1415 scientific articles that had the phrase “blood type diet” in either the title or abstract. Then they begin the elimination process. They eliminated:

  • Studies done in test tubes, cell culture, or animals. Only human clinical studies were included.
  • Reviews, commentaries, letters or opinions. Those contained no original scientific research.

At this point they were down to just 16 published clinical studies. Then they asked which of those studies were designed to test the central hypothesis of the blood type diet. They asked:

  • Did the study start with human subjects grouped according to blood type?
  • Did the study have an intervention in which the subjects were required to adhere to a particular type of diet?
  • Did the study measure a health outcome of the dietary intervention?

Guess what? Only one study met these criteria. Just one! And it was a fairly weak study involving a totally different blood typing system than the ABO blood groups.

The Bottom Line:

1)     There is no scientific evidence supporting the blood group diet. A lot has been written about the diet, but nobody has actually shown that it works. The Emperor Has No Clothes!

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Comments (5)

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Latest Article

The Dangers of Iodine Deficiency During Pregnancy

Posted December 6, 2016 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Does Your Prenatal Contain Enough Iodine?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

iodine deficiency during pregnancyA recent study (S.M. O’Kane et al, British Journal of Nutrition, doi.org/10.1017/S0007114516003925)  concluded that 2/3 of Irish women had no idea that iodine was important during pregnancy. In fact, 57% of the women had no idea what iodine was, and 41% were unable to name any health problem related to iodine deficiency. The authors of the study considered this ignorance about iodine to be alarming. I’ll discuss why below.

First, let’s consider the situation in the United States. I suspect ignorance about the importance of iodine is just as widespread in the United States as it is in Ireland. Think about the nutrients we have been told are essential for healthy pregnancy outcomes.

  • We have heard about the importance of iron and calcium for decades.
  • The importance of folic acid and other B vitamins has been widely publicized over the last 20 years.
  • In recent years, we have learned about the importance of omega-3s, especially DHA.

But who has been telling us about the importance of iodine? Almost nobody.

What Are The Recommendations For Iodine Intake?

The RDAs for iodine are:

  • 150 ug/day for adults
  • 220 ug/day for pregnant women
  • 290 ug/day for breastfeeding women

How Common Is Iodine Deficiency During Pregnancy?

iodine deficiency pregnant womenHere are some quick facts about iodine deficiency in the US from a recent American Academy of Pediatrics position paper  and the National Institutes of Health Consumer information site:

  • Approximately 1/3 of pregnant and lactating women in the United States are at least marginally iodine deficient.
  • To meet their RDA requirements for iodine during pregnancy and lactation the American Thyroid Association, The National Academy of Sciences, and The American Academy of Pediatrics all recommend pregnant and lactating women take supplements containing 150 ug of iodine.
  • Although most pregnant and lactating women take supplements:
    • Only 50% of prenatal supplements in the United States contain iodine.
    • Even worse, only 15% of the supplements pregnant and lactating women take contain iodine (some pregnant and lactating women take multivitamins rather than prenatal supplements).
  • Labeling can be deceptive. Most multivitamins and prenatal supplements specify the amount of potassium iodide in the supplement, not iodine. It requires at least 197 ug of potassium iodide to provide 150 ug of iodine.

In short, many pregnant and lactating women in this country are not getting enough iodine from their diet and the supplements they are taking may not provide the iodine they need.

 

Why Are So Many Americans Deficient In Iodine?

iodine deficiencyThe best and most reliable natural sources of iodine are seaweeds and ocean fish. Meats, dairy, and grains can be moderate sources of iodine, but their iodine content is highly variable. It depends on the iodine content of the soil in which they were produced and how they were processed.

Because the soil in the interior of this country is very low in iodine, crops and animals raised in much of our country are also low in iodine. That lead to widespread iodine deficiency in this country prior to the introduction of iodized salt in the 1920s. Iodized salt largely eliminated iodine deficiency in the 1920s. However, since the 1970s, iodine deficiency has been gradually returning to this country for many reasons.

  • In the 1920s most of our food was prepared at home, so most of the salt in our diet was iodized. However, today:
  • Processed foods are replacing home-cooked meals, and the salt used in processed foods is not iodized.
  • Much of the salt we use today is “gourmet” salt that is not iodized. Even sea salt often contains far less iodine than iodized salt.
  • Seaweed has never been considered a delicacy in this country, and increasingly, Americans are avoiding ocean fish because of concerns about our polluted oceans.
  • Iodine in commercial breads has traditionally come from the use of iodate as a dough conditioner. Today iodate has largely been replaced with bromide in commercial bread making. Not only does this trend decrease the amount of iodine available in our diet, but bromide  also interferes with iodine utilization in our bodies.
  • Iodine in milk has traditionally come from the use of iodine-containing disinfectants to clean milk cans and teats. However, they have largely been replaced with other disinfectants.

Together these trends have combined to create the “perfect storm”. Iodine deficiency has, once again, become a major health concern in the US and other developed countries.

 

The Dangers Of Iodine Deficiency During Pregnancy

dangers of iodine deficiency during pregnancyIodine is an essential component of the thyroid hormone. Accordingly, inadequate iodine intake leads to hypothyroidism. Thus, you might expect iodine deficiency to be associated with symptoms like fatigue, sensitivity to cold, dry skin, and unexpected weight gain.

However, you may not have known that thyroid hormone is also essential for bone and neural development during fetal development and infancy. Because of that, thyroid hormone production increases dramatically during pregnancy and lactation (Hence, the increase in iodine requirement for pregnant and lactating women).

I can’t emphasize strongly enough the consequences of iodine deficiency during pregnancy and lactation. Here is what the experts say:

 

The Bottom Line

 

  • Iodine is important for bone and neural development during both fetal development and infancy. Because of this, iodine requirements are significantly higher during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
  • The iodine content of the American diet has decreased significantly since the 1970s. Today approximately 1/3 of pregnant and lactating women in the United States are at least marginally iodine deficient.
  • The National Institutes of Health, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the World Health Organization all warn that even mild iodine deficiency during pregnancy and lactation can result in cognitive impairment in children.
  • Because of this, the American Thyroid Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that pregnant and lactating women take a supplement providing 150 ug of iodine. That corresponds to at least 197 ug of potassium iodide (the unit shown on most supplement labels).
  • Only 50% of prenatal supplements and 15% of multivitamin supplements contain iodine. Many that do contain iodine do not provide the recommended 197 ug of potassium iodide.

In short, many pregnant and lactating women in this country are not getting enough iodine from their diet; the consequences of even mild iodine deficiency are significant; and the supplements they are taking may not provide the iodine they need.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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