Does Diet for Children with ADHD Matter?

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in ADHD Diet

Could A Healthy Diet Help Your Child?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

diet for children with adhdDoes diet for children with ADHD matter?

The prevalence of ADHD appears to be skyrocketing. It increased by 42% in just 8 years between 2003 and 2011. Currently, 4.5 million children in the US are on ADHD medication, at a cost to taxpayers of $45 billion.

Unfortunately, ADHD medications come with serious side effects like loss of appetite and delayed growth, sleep disorders, nausea & stomach pains, headaches, moodiness and irritability. Even more worrisome is that many children say they “just don’t feel right” while they are on the drugs. Finally, there is the unintended message we are sending our children that drugs are the solution to their problems.

It is no wonder that millions of parents are looking for more natural solutions for their child’s ADHD. That is why recent headlines like “The Mediterranean Diet Could Help Children with ADHD” generate such interest.

In this issue of Health Tips From the Professor I have looked at the studies behind the headlines to answer your most pressing questions:

  • Would something as simple as the Mediterranean diet help my child control their ADHD symptoms?
  • Do they have to adhere to the Mediterranean diet, or would other healthy diets work just as well?

Answering these questions will tell us if diet for children with ADHD matters.

adhd dietHow Was The Study Designed?

The study behind the headlines (A Rios-Hernandez et al, Pediatrics DOI: 10.1542/peds.2016-2027) looked at 60 children and adolescents (ages 6-16) from southern Spain who were newly diagnosed with ADHD and compared them with 60 sex- and age-matched controls without ADHD from the same schools.

A food frequency questionnaire was administered by a trained interviewer and a scoring system called KIDMED was used to evaluate adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet. The study excluded children with more severe psychological problems and any children taking ADHD medications or nutritional supplements.

Does Diet for Children with ADHD Matter?

 

  • In a preliminary analysis of the data, the investigators discovered:
    • Breastfeeding was associated with decreased risk of ADHD.
    • Inactivity was associated with increased risk of ADHD.
    • Obesity was associated with increased risk of ADHD.

    child adhd dietOf course, the main point of the study was to investigate whether adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet influenced the risk of developing ADHD. The answer to this question was clear cut.

    • Adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet significantly reduced the risk of ADHD in both children and adolescents.

    So, clearly diet for children with ADHD does matter.

    Next, the investigators used the data obtained from the food frequency questionnaires to ask what components of a Mediterranean diet were most influential in reducing the risk of developing ADHD. These results were also very interesting:

    Dietary components that decreased the risk of ADHD included:

    • Consuming two or more servings of fruit every day (In Spain, the extra servings of fruit were primarily citrus, but presumably other fruits would be just as effective).
    • Consuming fresh or cooked vegetables more than once a day.
    • Consuming fatty fish on a regular basis (2-3 times a week).
    • Consuming grains or rice almost every day.
    • Starting the day with a healthy breakfast.

    Dietary components that increased the risk of ADHD included:

    • Eating at fast food restaurants more than once a week.
    • Skipping breakfast.
    • High consumption of soft drinks.
    • High consumption of candy and sugar.

    What Does This Mean For You?

    foods adhd dietThis study clearly showed that adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a significantly lower incidence of ADHD.

    Of course, this study was conducted in southern Spain where a healthy diet is the Mediterranean diet. The question for people in other parts of the world is whether other healthy diets would work just as well.

    Based on their detailed study of the effect of individual dietary components, it is reasonable to assume that any healthy diet that…

    …emphasized fresh fruits & vegetables, whole grains, omega-3-rich fish, and…

    …started the day with a healthy breakfast, and…

    …minimized (or eliminated) fast foods, sodas, candy & other sweets…

    …would reduce the risk of ADHD.

    Plus, this is an approach that has no side effects. Just side benefits.

    Finally, if you read the study carefully, it is clear a holistic approach is always best. For example:

    • Individual dietary components had small effects on ADHD symptoms.
    • When those individual components were combined into a healthy diet, a major reduction in ADHD symptoms was observed.
    • The study suggested that reduction in ADHD symptoms would be even greater with a healthy lifestyle that included regular exercise and weight control.
    • The authors stated that supplementation could also play a role in reducing ADHD symptoms. They felt the best evidence was for supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids and a multivitamin multimineral supplement.

We can certainly conclude that diet for children with ADHD matters.

 

The Bottom Line

 

A recent study in southern Spain has looked at the relationship between adherence to a healthy Mediterranean diet and the risk of developing ADHD symptoms in children and adolescents.

  • In a preliminary analysis of the data, the investigators discovered:
    • Breastfeeding was associated with decreased risk of ADHD.
    • Inactivity was associated with increased risk of ADHD.
    • Obesity was associated with increased risk of ADHD.
  • These factors were independent of adherence to a Mediterranean diet.
  • Adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet significantly reduced the risk of ADHD in both children and adolescents. This was the major finding of the study.
  • The dietary components in the study that decreased the risk of ADHD were:
    • Consuming two or more servings of fruit every day (In Spain, the extra servings of fruit were primarily citrus, but presumably other fruits would be just as effective).
    • Consuming fresh or cooked vegetables more than once a day.
    • Consuming fatty fish on a regular basis (2-3 times a week).
    • Consuming grains or rice almost every day.
    • Starting the day with a healthy breakfast.
  • The dietary components that increased the risk of ADHD were:
    • Eating at fast food restaurants more than once a week.
    • Skipping breakfast.
    • High consumption of soft drinks.
    • High consumption of candy and sugar.
  • Based on their detailed study of the effect of individual dietary components, it is reasonable to assume that any healthy diet that…
    • …emphasized fresh fruits & vegetables, whole grains, omega-3-rich fish, and…
    • …started the day with a healthy breakfast, and…
    • …minimized (or eliminated) fast foods, sodas, candy & other sweets……would reduce the risk of ADHD.
  • Plus, this is an approach that has no side effects. Just side benefits.
  • Finally, if you read the study carefully, it is clear a holistic approach is always best. That would include:
    • A healthy diet
    • regular exercise and weight control.
    • Supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids and a multivitamin multimineral supplement.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Latest Article

How To Treat Tight Hamstrings

Posted March 21, 2017 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Stretching Hamstrings Can Cause Them To Tear

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT – The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

how to treat tight hamstrings“Don’t stretch your hamstrings” is the opposite advice to that given to the vast majority of athletes, especially runners. There is good reason to stop before you stretch, and consider why your hamstrings feel tight in the first place before determining how to treat tight hamstrings.

I received a message about a hamstring injury on one of the forums that I moderate. The message came from a father who was concerned about his 12YO son, an avid athlete. While stretching his hamstrings, he heard a “pop” and immediately felt pain at his butt and behind his knee. A few days had passed and the boy was still having hamstring pain while sitting and walking.

The first thing someone may tell him is to stretch, and that’s the last thing that should be done. He needs to get an MRI to make sure that his hamstring tendon isn’t torn. If that’s okay, then he needs to look more in depth to find out why his hamstrings are tight.

Why Your Hamstrings May Be Overstretched

overstretched hamstringsVery often your hamstrings will feel tight even though they are actually being overstretched!  Your hamstrings originate on your posterior pelvis, and one of your quadriceps muscles originates on the front of your pelvis. The quadriceps muscle is Rectus Femoris which goes from your pelvis, over your kneecap and down to your shin bone.

When your Rectus Femoris is tight, it will pull your pelvis down in the front. This causes your pelvis to move up in the back, and your hamstrings get overstretched. Your hamstrings feel tight, but if you then try to stretch them, you could tear them. In fact, if they are tight enough, you could actually pull the tendon away from the bone.

I’ve found that your hamstrings will often release on their own when you treat your quadriceps. As your quadriceps aren’t pulling down on the front of your pelvis, it allows your posterior pelvis to go down. As your posterior pelvis goes down, it releases the over-stretch from your hamstrings.

How to Treat Tight Hamstrings

release quadricep tensionPay attention to tight quadriceps when deciding how to treat tight hamstrings.

Fortunately, it’s really easy to release the tension in your quadriceps. I teach these treatments, and many more, in my book: Treat Yourself To Pain-Free Living.

In this picture, I’m using the Julstro Power Roller to push (don’t roll) from the top of my thigh to just above my knee.

I’ve found that the Power Roller gives more focused strength than using a foam roller. Also, tools that have beads that roll can’t go deep enough to reach the lower fibers of this thick muscle.

You’ll find a big spasm, which feels like a bump, at the point shown in this picture. When you go over the spasm, it will hurt so start out slow and build up strength to go deeper.

Also, treating your quadriceps will not only help release your hamstrings, but it is also the treatment for knee pain. This helps you eliminate two painful conditions, not just one! This is also one of the series of treatments for releasing low back, hip, and groin pain. It’s an especially good self-treatment to learn. You can also do this treatment while sitting in a chair with your knee slightly bent.

 How to Treat Tight Hamstrings While Treating Spasms

treat tight hamstringsAFTER you treat your quadriceps, then you can treat your hamstrings. The picture on the left not only treats the spasms, but it also stretches your hamstrings.

I prefer the Julstro Perfect Ball  over any other type of ball.  The Perfect Ball is solid in the middle and soft on the outside, giving great pressure without hurting the muscle.

Put the Perfect Ball on a hard surface such as a wooden stool or corner of a desk.

Rest your hamstrings on top of the ball, moving until you find the spasm in the muscle.

Finish by straightening your leg which will stretch your hamstrings. Go slowly and don’t strain the muscle, just move to a “hurts so good” level.

pain free living bookTreat Yourself to Pain-Free Living  shows you how to treat spasms from your head to your feet. If you are in pain, or if you love sports and your joints feel tight, this book will become your favorite “tool!”

Now, you know how to treat tight hamstrings.

Wishing you well,

Julie Donnelly

 

About The Author

julie donnelly

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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