Are Supplements Worth It?

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Healthy Living, Supplements and Health

A Cost, Benefit Analysis of Supplementation

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

are supplements worth itAre supplements worth it?  There is no question that supplements add to the family budget. As families juggle their budgets it is natural to wonder whether the supplements they are buying are worth the cost.

It is only natural to ask questions like: “What is the cost, benefit ratio of supplementation?” “Is there any evidence that supplementation today will save us money in health care costs down the road?”

If a recent study is accurate, the answer to that last question may be a resounding yes!

How the Study Was Designed

A number of studies in the past have suggested that supplementation reduces health care costs, but they have suffered from a variety of methodological pitfalls so their conclusions could not be considered definitive.

In a time of skyrocketing health care costs coupled with governments tightening their budgets worldwide, it has become increasingly important for those governments to determine what the most cost effective public health interventions are. Thus, the question of whether supplementation can decrease health care costs has become paramount.

Therefore, an international group of scientists decided to do a systematic review and meta-analysis of the cost effectiveness of supplementation (Elia et al, Clinical Nutrition, doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2015.07.012). They included only the highest quality previous studies in their analysis. After screening 16,598 published studies they excluded all but 19 in their final evaluation. The studies that they included had the following characteristics.

  • The subjects were supplementing with a commercially available multi-nutrient supplement that also contained protein and calories (i.e. a meal replacement supplement). Subjects consuming disease-specific supplements or immune-enhancing supplements were excluded from the study.
  • Subjects were studied in a wide variety of settings, including both free living individuals in the community and those in care homes
  • In some cases the supplementation was begun while they were in the hospital and continued when they went home. In other cases supplementation was begun while they were at home and continued after admission to the hospital.
  • Subjects were of all ages.

Are Supplements Worth It — The Money?

are supplements worth the moneyFrom a public health perspective the conclusion from this study was clear. Supplementation with a basic meal replacement supplement saves money. It is an effective public health intervention.

  • Overall, supplementation decreased health care costs by 8.1%.
  • For studies lasting less than 3 months, supplementation reduced health care costs by 9.2%. These were most often short-term pre- and/or post-operative supplementation studies. The cost savings ranged from $300-$530 per patient.
  • For studies lasting more than 3 months, supplementation reduced health care costs by 5%. These were mostly long-term community studies.
  • Overall, the costs savings attributable to supplementation were most apparent in short term studies involving a hospital component and in those studies involving younger patients.

The first observation was expected, but the second was a bit of a surprise. The general assumption is that elderly patients are more likely to suffer from malnutrition and benefit from supplementation. These data suggest that suboptimal nutrition may be more prevalent in younger adults than generally anticipated.

The reduction in health care costs was primarily due to:

  • Significant (16.5%) reduction in hospital admissions.
  • Decreased length of stay in the hospital.
  • Decreased infections.
  • Reduced post-operative complications.
  • Reduced falls and functional limitations in the elderly.

Although, it did not factor into the cost analysis, those subjects using the meal replacement supplement reported greater quality of life as well.  Are supplements worth it?  For some, a greater quality of life would help answer that question.

Strengths and Weaknesses of the Study

This was an excellent study, but it does have some important limitations.

  • While the systematic review and meta-analysis was very well done, it is limited by the quality of the studies that were included in the analysis, and most of those studies had one or more limitations. The authors acknowledged the need for future large scale, prospective studies, that are designed specifically to measure the cost effectiveness of supplementation.
  • The authors focused almost entirely on the cost benefit analysis. No information was provided on:
  • The health of these subjects
  • Why they were using a meal replacement supplement
  • Whether they decided to use the meal replacement supplement on their own or whether it was recommended by their doctor.

Thus, it is a bit difficult to extrapolate these data from a public health perspective to an individual perspective – the question of whether supplementation reduces health care costs sufficiently to be cost effective for you and me.

  • This study showed that even a basic meal replacement supplement has a significant effect on reducing health care costs in a variety of settings. However, it provides no information on whether individuals would obtain even greater benefit if they included other supplements in their program.

The Bottom Line

  1. A recent study has shown that even a simple meal replacement supplement can be an effective public health intervention because it significantly reduces health care costs and improves quality of life.
  2. The most significant reductions in health care costs came from:
    • A significant (16.5%) reduction in hospital admissions.
    • Decreased length of stay in the hospital.
    • Decreased infections.
    • Reduced post-operative complications.
    • Reduced falls and functional limitations in the elderly.
  3. The cost savings were most significant when the meal replacement supplement was used just prior to or following hospital admission for a surgical procedure. This argues strongly for a basic program of nutrition supplementation whenever you are preparing for surgery.However, as the saying goes “Stuff happens”. We don’t always know the precise date and time of our next hospital admission. This may be one case where an ounce of prevention is definitely worth a pound of cure.
  4. The study did include some long term studies of free living individuals in the community, but it is difficult to directly extrapolate from this study to the question of how much a basic meal replacement supplement might reduce health care costs for healthy individuals like you and me.However, many of the things we do to improve our health – buy organic, go on a diet program, purchase a gym membership, or go on a supplement program, for example – cost us money. It is studies like this that suggest at least a portion of those costs may be offset by reduced health care costs down the road.
  5. Finally, this study only looked at the cost effectiveness of a basic meal replacement supplement. It does not provide any information on whether addition of other supplements might provide even greater health care savings.There are studies suggesting that a holistic approach to supplementation may reduce disease burden long term (for example; Nutr J. 2007 Oct 24; 6:30). A detailed cost effectiveness analysis has not been performed on those studies, so we cannot say how much money they might save in reduced health care costs over the long term. However, if a holistic program of diet, exercise and supplementation keeps me out of the doctor’s office and out of the hospital, I’m happy.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Latest Article

Groin Pain Relief

Posted April 16, 2019 by Dr. Steve Chaney

What Is The Pectineus Muscle And Why Is It Important?

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT –The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

Spring Is In The Air

spring floridaI remember as a child we sang “Though April showers may come your way…they bring the flowers that bloom in May…”

Of course, here in Florida we are blessed with flowers all year, but there’s still a lovely feeling that happens in Spring.  It’s still cool enough most days to go out running, and the humidity is still low.  Traffic will soon be easing up as our friends from the north start their trek back home, and daylight savings time is giving us more time to get to the beach for sunset.  Lovely!

Fun Facts About Spring….

  • The earliest known use of the term “spring cleaning” was in 1857
  • The word “spring” has been used for the season since the 16th century
  • The first day of spring is called the vernal equinox
  • On the first day of spring, the sunrise and sunset are about 12 hours apart everywhere on earth
  • Spring fever isn’t just a saying. Experts say the body changes due to the temperature and can cause an upset in your health.
  • The actual start of spring varies from March 19th to the 21st, but it is commonly celebrated on the 21st.

Do you like to garden?  Now is the perfect time to get your gardens planted so you’ll have home grown veggies for the entire summer.  For me, it’s also a great time to do some spring cleaning and get the house in order before the summer closes all the windows and the air conditioning becomes our indoor relief.

But these activities can also cause a strain on muscles, so don’t forget to take care of yourself. If you put too much strain on muscles you haven’t used all winter, you can develop problems and need groin pain relief.

 

A Tiny Muscle Can Cause Groin Pain

groin pain relief pectineusLately I’ve had several clients come in because of groin pain that has their medical practitioners stumped.  Their symptoms are varied, but most complain that it feels like they hit their pubic bone with a rubber mallet.  Ouch!

One client loves to ride her horse, but the pain had prevented that for several weeks. Another was considering selling the motorcycle that she and her husband love because she just can’t sit on it anymore.

Several years ago, I had a male client tell me that he had this same pain and he was told it could be his prostrate causing the issue.  Fortunately, that wasn’t he problem at all.

The muscle that caused all these problems, and a lot more, is the Pectineus.

The Pectineus muscle originates on your pubic bone and inserts into the very top of your inner thigh bone (femur).

You can see the Pectineus and surrounding muscles more clearly by going to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pectineus_muscle

Most muscles have more than one function, and this is true for the Pectineus.  The function we’ll look at today is called adduction.  It brings your leg in toward midline.  If you think of a soccer player kicking the ball with the inside of his ankle, it was the Pectineus that helped draw his leg in so he could do the shot.

Each of my clients had pain while trying to bring their leg out so they could sit on their horse, or on their motorcycle.  The tight muscle was pulling on their pubic bone and causing a severe strain.

This muscle is easier to have someone else treat it for you because of its location but give it a try and see if you can locate & treat it yourself.

 

Groin Pain Relief

groin pain relief treatmentThe picture to the left is showing an athlete self-treating her adductors.  These muscles, and the Pectineus muscle, all originate at the same point on the pubic bone.  The picture is showing her massaging the middle of the adductors.

To reach the Pectineus, move the ball all the way up to the crease in your leg.  You can do the treatment with a ball, but because of the size of the muscle and its location, it’s easier to do it with your fingertips.

Sit as this athlete is sitting, and even bring your opposite leg up so your foot is flat on the floor.  For example, in this picture, the athlete would bring her right leg up so her right foot is on the floor, and then lean a bit further onto her left hip.  That opens up the area so she can reach a bit easier into the muscle while using her fingertips.

Press into the muscle, being careful to feel for a pulse, and moving if you feel one.  If the Pectineus is in spasm, you’ll know it immediately when you press on it.  If it’s not in spasm, you won’t be able to find it at all.

Remember to stay within your pain tolerance level, this isn’t a “no pain, no gain” situation.  Never go deeper than what feels tender, but not so much that you want to faint. Hold the pressure for 15 seconds. Then let up on the pressure, but keep your fingers in the same place.

Repeat this movement several times. Each time it will hurt less, and eventually it won’t hurt at all.  That’s when the muscle has completely released, and you will have relief from the pain.

It’s as simple as that!

Why stay in pain when it’s so easy to find the muscular source of the problem and eliminate it?

calf cramps remedy bookTreat Yourself to Pain-Free Living (https://julstromethod.com/product/treat-yourself-to-pain-free-living-hardcopy/). It is filled with over 100 pictures and descriptions proven to show you how to find and self-treat muscle spasms from head to foot!

Join the 1000’s of people worldwide who have discovered that tight muscles were the true source of pains they thought were from arthritis, fibromyalgia, and other serious conditions.  You have nothing to lose, and everything to gain by releasing tight muscles.

Treat Yourself to Pain-Free Living is your step-by-step guide to pain relief!

 

Wishing you well,

 

Julie Donnelly

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

julie donnellyAbout The Author

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

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