Preventing And Reversing Osteoporosis

A Bone Health Lifestyle

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT – The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

Woman Enjoying Autumn LeavesFall is glorious in my book.  I was up in New York a few weeks ago, and the trees were just changing – I was about a week too early for the best colors, but it was still beautiful. Then I flew out to Lake Tahoe, and it was really beautiful there.  The air was crisp and clean, and I loved all the fall decorations.

In Florida we are entering our most wonderful time of year. It’s starting to get cooler, the humidity is going down, and hurricane season is over. Hooray!  It’s great to be outdoors again!

Please remember all the people who are still going through very difficult times in the Bahamas.  Many people have lost their homes, their workplaces and the income that supports them, and some have lost loved ones. A devastating loss.

We here in the USA were blessed that Dorian didn’t come any further west and do the same thing to Florida, Georgia, and the Carolinas. I wanted to share what I have with the people who now have nothing. That made me search for places I trust that will send all the money I donate. In case you want to help, and you don’t have a favorite charity, I want to share those places with you:

https://disaster.salvationarmyusa.org

http://secure.americares.org/help/now‎

https://www.mercycorps.org/articles/hurricane-dorian-bahamas#mercy-corps-helping

Preventing And Reversing Osteoporosis

Exercise And NutritionWeight-bearing exercise builds strong bones. That statement is so common that just about everyone knows they need to exercise for strong muscles and bones, and for all the good it does for just about every system in the body.  And, we are what we eat, so nutrition is vital.

Do you like to exercise? Some people are almost addicted to exercise, but I’m not one of them.  I go to the gym and I have a fitness trainer to help me stay on track, but it fits right in with my eagerness of going to the dentist.  I must say, I’d like that to change, and maybe if I can find a workout partner, it will.

Meanwhile I need to do something because I’ve been told I have osteoporosis. Yikes! One thing for sure, I’m not taking any type of medication. I truly believe there is another solution.

While I’m not an exercise nut, I do love nutrition and I know that the body is so adaptable that if it’s given the proper nutrition, it can do miracles. I believe nutrition and exercise can reverse this osteoporosis diagnosis.

A Bone Healthy Lifestyle

A Bone Healthy Lifestyle
A Bone Healthy Lifestyle

The first thing I did was contact my friend, Steve Chaney, PhD, author of the weekly blog “Health Tips From The Professor.  He pointed me to an article he had written on a “Bone Healthy Lifestyle”. Here is a brief summary:

  • Exercise, calcium, and vitamin D are all essential for bone formation. If any of them are missing, you can’t form healthy bone. The reason so many clinical studies on calcium supplementation and bone density have come up empty is that exercise, or vitamin D, or both were not included in the study.
  • Get plenty of weight bearing exercise. This is an essential part of a bone healthy lifestyle. Your local Y can probably give you guidance if you can’t afford a personal trainer. Of course, if you have physical limitations or have a disease, you should consult with your health professional before beginning any exercise program.
  • Get your blood 25-hydroxy vitamin D level tested. If it is low, take enough supplemental vitamin D to get your 25-hydroxy vitamin D level into the adequate range – optimal is even better. Adequate blood levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D are also essential for you to be able to utilize calcium efficiently.
  • Consume a “bone healthy” diet that emphasizes fresh fruits and vegetables, minimizes meats, and eliminates sodas and other acidic beverages. For more details on whether your favorite foods are acid-forming or alkaline-forming, you can find plenty of charts on the internet.
  • Minimize the use of medications that adversely affect bone density. You’ll need to work with your doctor on this one.
  • Consider a calcium supplement. Even when you are doing everything else correctly, you still need adequate calcium in your diet to form strong bones. Dr. Chaney wasn’t advocating a “one-size fits all” 1,000 to 1,200 mg/day for everyone. Supplementation is always most effective when you actually need it. For example:

o   If you are not including dairy products in your diet (either because they are acid-forming or for other health reasons), it will be difficult for you to get adequate amounts of calcium in your diet. You can get calcium from other food sources such as green leafy vegetables. However, unless you plan your diet very carefully you will probably not get enough.

o   If you are taking medications that decrease bone density, that may increase your need for supplemental calcium. Ask your pharmacist about the effect of any medications you are taking on your calcium requirements.

  • If you do use a calcium supplement, make sure it is complete. Don’t just settle for calcium and vitamin D. At the very least you will want your supplement to contain magnesium and vitamin K. Dr. Chaney recommends that it also contain zinc, copper, and manganese.

Between increasing my exercise and ramping up all the nutrients that build bone, I just know that by this time next year I’m going to be surprising the doctor with my great health

Does Vitamin D Reduce Cholesterol In Children?

Is Vitamin D Associated With Heart Disease Risk?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

vitamin-d-reduce-cholesterol-childrenNot too many years ago, we thought of vitamin D as affecting bone density and little else. Then we discovered that almost every cell in our body has vitamin D receptors. This has lead to research suggesting that vitamin D affects our health in many ways that were unimaginable only a couple of decades ago.

For example, low vitamin D levels are associated with increased risk of heart disease. The linkage between vitamin D and heart disease has not been proven. Nor do we know the mechanism. However, this has lead to ongoing research asking if there is any relationship between vitamin D and cholesterol metabolism.

The answer appears to be yes. Several studies have suggested a correlation between low vitamin D levels and elevated total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides – all risk factors for heart disease.

The next question is how early in life is this correlation found. Again, some studies have suggested that the same correlation between low vitamin D and high levels of unhealthy lipids are found in teens. But, what about pre-teens, children who haven’t gone through puberty yet? That’s what this study was designed to determine.

 

How Was The Study Done?

vitamin-d-reduce-cholesterol-children studyThe current study  was based on data collected from 419 children, ages 6-8, in the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) Study in Eastern Finland. This was a lifestyle study that collected information on body weight, diet, and activity levels.

Fasting blood samples were also collected and analyzed for blood lipid levels (total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides) and for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), which is considered the most accurate measure of vitamin D status. The National Institutes of Health considers:

  • <30 nmol/L of 25(OH)D an indicator of vitamin D deficiency.
  • 30 to <50 nmol/L 25(OH)D an indicator of vitamin D insufficiency.
  • ≥50 nmol/L 25(OH)D an indicator of adequate vitamin D status.

To put this study in perspective, vitamin D status is a major concern in Finland because of its proximity to the Arctic Circle. There is little sunlight in the winter, and, although the days are long in the summer, the sun is weak. The major sources of vitamin D in the Finnish diet are fish, vitamin D-fortified fluid milk products, vitamin D-fortified fat spreads, and vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D fortification was introduced in Finland in 2003. Vitamin D supplementation has also become increasing popular. The number of people using vitamin D supplements has increased from 11% in 2000 to 41% in 2011.

A recent study  looking a vitamin D status between 2000 and 2011 found that the combination of food fortification and vitamin D supplementation has been successful at improving vitamin D status in the Finnish population, increasing average 25(OH)D levels from 48 nmol/L to 65 nmol/L.

 

Does Vitamin D Reduce Cholesterol In Children?

vitamin dIn this study the mean serum 25(OH)D in the children was 68.1 nmol/L. 20% of the children had serum 25(OH)D below 50 nmol/L, and only 4 children (1%) had serum 25(OH)D below 30 nmol/L. When 25(OH)D levels were compared with blood lipid levels:

  • Higher serum 25(OH)D levels were associated with lower plasma levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.
  • The association between higher 25(OH)D levels and lower blood levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol remained after correcting for weight, physical activity, sedentary behavior, diet, daylight time, parental education, and genetic mutations known to affect vitamin D metabolism.

What Does This Mean For You?

I don’t want to overinterpret the study. Not all studies show an inverse association between 25(OH)D and cholesterol levels. Most of the previous studies have also indicated that higher 25(OH)D levels were associated increased HDL levels, while this study found higher 25(OH)D levels associated with decreased HDL levels. Much more research needs to be done.

However, this study is yet another indication that optimal vitamin D status may be important for heart health, even in young children. While the correlation between vitamin D status and heart health is not definitive at present, virtually everyone agrees that adequate vitamin D status is a good thing.

My recommendations are to:

  • Get as much vitamin D as possible from vitamin D-fortified foods, oily fish, and sensible sun exposure.
  • Get your serum 25(OH)D level determined and take vitamin D supplements if it is low.

 

The Bottom Line

 

A recent study of vitamin D status in Finnish children ages 6-8 found:

  • Higher vitamin D status was associated with lower plasma levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.
  • The association between better vitamin D status and lower blood levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol remained after correcting for weight, physical activity, sedentary behavior, diet, daylight time, parental education, and genetic mutations known to affect vitamin D metabolism.

This study is another indication that optimal vitamin D status may be important for heart health, even in young children. While the correlation between vitamin D status and heart health is not definitive at present, virtually everyone agrees that adequate vitamin D status is a good thing.

My recommendations are to:

  • Get as much vitamin D as possible from vitamin D-fortified foods, oily fish, and sensible sun exposure.
  • Get your serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level determined and take vitamin D supplements if it is low.
  • Make sure your children are getting enough vitamin D in their diet and have optimal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D.

For more details, read the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!