Are Cholesterol Lowering Drugs Right For You?

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Drugs and Health, Issues

Do Statins Really Work?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

Do statins really work?Statins – those ubiquitous drugs used to lower cholesterol levels – are big business!

Over 20 million Americans are currently being treated with statin drugs at a cost that runs into billions of dollars every year. And cardiologists have just recommended that another 20 million Americans consider using cholesterol lowering drugs. 44% of the men and 22% of the women in this country are now being told that they should be using statin drugs.

Some of my cardiologist friends are so convinced that statin drugs prevent death from heart attacks that they have said, only half-joking, that we should just add statins to the water supply.

Are Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Right For You?

Is the faith of doctors in the power of statin drugs to prevent death from heart disease justified? To answer that question in full we need to look at people who have already survived a heart attack and people who have never had a heart attack separately.

If you’ve already had a heart attack the evidence is clear cut.

  • If you have had a heart attack, there is good evidence that statins will reduce your risk of dying from a second heart attack.
  • In the technical jargon of the scientific world that is referred to as secondary prevention.

But what about those millions of Americans who are being prescribed statin drugs who have never had a heart attack? This is something we scientists refer to as primary prevention.

What Do The Studies Actually Say About Statins And Primary Prevention?

Here the evidence is not clear at all. Two major reports have cast doubt on the assumption that statins actually do prevent heart attacks in people who have not already had a first heart attack.

In the first study, Dr. Kausik Ray and colleagues from Cambridge University in England performed a meta-analyis of 11 clinical studies involving over 65,000 participants (Ray et al, Arch. Int. Med., 170: 1024-1031, 2010). They focused on those participants in the studies who had not previously had a heart attack (primary prevention).

  • They found that the use of statins over an average of 3.7 years had no statistically significant effect on mortality. In short, statins had no effect on the risk of dying from heart disease or any other cause.
  • Dr. Sreenivasa Sechasai, one of the doctors involved in the study, said “We didn’t find a significant reduction in death despite having such a huge sample size. This is the totality of evidence in primary prevention. So if we can’t show a reduction with this data, it is unlikely to be there.”

The second study was a Cochrane Systemic Review of statins published January 19th, 2011.  It stated that there was not enough scientific evidence to recommend the use of statins in people with no previous history of heart disease with some caveats (see below).

To help you understand the significance of that conclusion, let me give you a bit of background:

  • First you need to understand that the Cochrane Collaboration is an independent, non-profit organization that carefully reviews the scientific evidence behind medical treatments and proposed medical treatments.
  • Cochrane Reviews are considered the “Holy Grail” of evidence-based medicine (ie. medicine based on the best scientific evidence rather than what the pharmaceutical companies would have you believe).
  • So when a Cochrane Review concludes that there isn’t enough evidence to recommend use of statins in patients with no prior history of heart disease that is pretty big news in the medical world.

How Should These Studies Be Interpreted?

Please don’t misinterpret what I am saying. The Cochrane Review said that statin drugs are overprescribed, but it did not say that everyone who has not had a heart attack will not benefit from statins. It said that there are a number of risk factors that need to be considered in evaluating individual patients for statin use.

  • Simply put, that means that it is not as simple as saying that everyone with no previous history of heart disease should not be on statin drugs.
  • If you are currently taking statin drugs and you have no previous history of heart disease, you may want to discuss with your physician whether the Cochrane Review of statin drugs changes their opinion of whether se of those drugs is still warranted for you.
  • But the bottom line is that only your physician is trained to take into account all of the factors that increase your risk of heart disease and the best therapeutic approach for reducing your risk of heart attack.

There Is A Double Standard In The Medical Community

More importantly, these studies highlight the difficulty in showing that anything works when you start out with a healthy group of adults with no prior evidence of disease (primary prevention).

And, the way that doctors have responded to primary prevention studies shows that there is a double standard in how primary prevention trials are interpreted in the medical community. For example:

  • There is no good evidence that statins prevent fatal heart attacks in healthy people.
  • However, because statins do work in high risk patients, most doctors recommend their use by millions of Americans who have never had a heart attack.
  • There is also no good evidence that nutrients like vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids prevent fatal heart attacks in healthy people.
  • However, there is evidence that both vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids prevent heart attacks in high risk patients, yet most doctors will tell you they are a waste of money.

It is food for thought.

The Bottom Line

1)    Statin drugs clearly save lives when used by people who have already had a heart attack.

2)    On the other hand, there is no proof that statin drugs prevent heart attacks in people who have not previously had a heart attack

3)    Statin drugs do have side effects. Increased risk of diabetes, liver damage, muscle damage and kidney failure are the best documented, although memory loss has also been reported.

4)    I am not recommending that you stop using statin drugs without consulting your doctor. I am suggesting that you discuss the benefits and risks of statin drug use with your doctor.

5)    Perhaps the most important poin tto come out of these studies is that it almost impossible to prove the benefit of any intervention in a primary prevention trial. If you can’t prove that statins work in healthy people, it is not surprising that it is difficult to prove that other interventions work.

6)   Finally, the way that these studies have been interpreted shows that there is a clear double standard in how the medical community evaluates primary intervention trials.

  • Statin drugs don’t show any benefit in a primary prevention setting, yet most doctors still recommend them.
  • Vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids don’t show any benefit in a primary prevention setting, and most doctors recommend against them.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Comments (14)

  • Lyle Yoder

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    Thank you for the thoughtful article; I am a layman and student of healthy living, a Shaklee user for over forty years. In that pursuit I came across a certain Dr. Russell Blaylock a 30 year veteran brain surgeon; who is diametally opposed to the use of any type of statin drugs. He claims tha cholesterol build up in the arteries comes from inflammation and not from excess cholesterol. He further states that cholesterol amounts now recommended are far to low and is very dangerous to our brain which approximately eighty-five percent cholesterol the lack of iwhich may well contribute to early dimensia and other electrical parts of our annatoamy.

    Lyle Yoder

    FOOD FOR THOUGHT.

    Reply

  • Sharon Hill

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    Very timely and important article, Steve. I appreciate it very much.

    Reply

  • Karen

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    Great article!! Interesting yet not really surprising about the double standard. Medical community has their own agenda. Money! What would you tell someone whose father died very young from a heart attack? I don’t really know if its a history of genetics or the lifestyle of smoking and drinking that was the culprit but the history is there. I would much rather see the natural supplementation route but there is a lot of fear in NOT taking the statins placed by the physician. Hard to go up against the one with all credentials.

    Reply

    • Dr. Steve Chaney

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      Dear Karen,
      I just came across an interesting article on the subject by Joe & Terry Graedon (You may be familiar with their “People’s Pharmacy talk show on NPR and their web site http://www.PeoplesPharmacy.com). They referenced a recent study that concluded: “A healthy Mediterranean-style diet could be as effective as statins without the side effects” (JAMA Internal Medicine, Oct. 28, 2013).
      Dr. Chaney

      Reply

  • David Norby

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    Great article. I have a question regarding blood cholesterol levels. High levels are supposed to be a risk factor for heart attacks, so statins are given to lower those levels, which they usually do. So, are the studies implying that cholesterol levels are not a risk factor for heart disease? Or the recommended levels are incorrect, as implied by Blaylock? There are two issues, I think – statins and heart disease plus cholesterol and heart disease. This has probably already been written about.

    Reply

    • Dr. Steve Chaney

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      Dear David,

      Great question, but there is not a simple answer. Elevated cholesterol is one risk factor. Inflammation, LDL/HDL ratio, particle size, triglycerides, high blood pressure, and diabetes are also all important risk factors. Statins are favored by many cardiologists because they lower both cholesterol and inflammation.

      My point was not to say that statins were ineffective in people at risk of heart disease. They might well be. My point was that it was impossible to prove that they were effective for people who have not yet had a heart attack. And, if you can’t prove that stains prevent heart attacks in healthy people, why should it surprise anyone that it is difficult to prove that vitamin E, B vitamins or omega-3 fatty acids prevent heart attacks in healthy people.

      Dr. Chaney

      Reply

  • Shirley

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    I, too, have read and heard about the statin controversy. I have diabetes and heart disease in my family history. I have tried all different statins with serious side effects. Crestor doesn’t seem to cause any problems. Before starting medication, my chloresterol was 363, now it’s under 200. I am reluctant to stop taking the drug.

    Reply

    • Dr. Steve Chaney

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      Dear Shirley,

      Most experts agree that someone with a cholesterol level of 363 should be taking a statin if they can tolerate it. The new guidelines include many people with cholesterol levels in the 200 range or less. It is this recommendation that has stirred controversy among the experts.

      D Chaney

      Reply

  • JoAn

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    Dr. Chaney, please comment on red yeast rice for reducing cholesterol ratio, inflammation, etc. Are there two kinds: One made in China (don’t take because it is like a statin) and one in the USA? What about 5-HTP?

    Reply

    • Dr. Steve Chaney

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      Dear JoAn,
      The active ingredient in red yeast is a natural statin. It can have the same effectiveness and the same potential side effects as the synthetic statin drugs. But, you put your finger on the most important concern. Red yeast rice is sold as a food supplement, and most food supplement companies don’t perform the same quality control tests that the drug companies employ. If you are using a red yeast rice supplement, make sure you are getting it from a reputable company that employs rigorous quality control tests.
      Dr. Chaney

      Reply

  • Carol E.

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    I have taken all the statins for different periods of time and then stopped because they cause muscle problems in my arms in particular.

    My nephrologist/internist gets very angry with me because I stop. He says “ok you will get a heart attack or stroke and die”. I cannot help it that my muslces hurt….BUT he doesn’t listen to me.

    Reply

    • Dr. Steve Chaney

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      Dear Bunny,
      You probably already know that there is no magic “ab cruncher” that gets rid of body fat. But a well designed exercise program couple with a high protein diet (with moderate amounts of healthy carbs & fats) will slowly get rid of that belly fat. It won’t happen overnight, bur it also didn’t develop overnight.
      Dr. Chaney

      Reply

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Latest Article

Relieve Hip Pain After Sitting or Driving

Posted June 20, 2017 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Relief is Just a Few Movements Away!

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT – The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

relieve hip pain after sittingI’m on a long business trip, speaking and teaching in Tennessee and New York, and the drive from Sarasota, FL meant many hours of driving over several days.  One of my stops was to visit with Suzanne and Dr. Steve Chaney at their home in North Carolina.  It was that long drive that became the inspiration for this blog.

After all those hours of driving, my hip was really sore. It was painful to stand up. While talking to Suzanne and Dr. Chaney I was using my elbow to work on the sore area, and when we were discussing the blog for this month it only made sense to share this technique with you.  So, Dr. Chaney took pictures and I sat at his computer to write.  I thought others may want to how to relieve hip pain after sitting or driving for long periods.

What Causes Anterior Hip Pain?

As I’ve mentioned in posts in the past, sitting is the #1 cause of low back pain, and it also causes anterior hip pain (pain localized towards the front of the hip) because the muscles (psoas and iliacus) pass through the hip and insert into the tendons that then insert into the top of the thigh bone.  When hip pain reliefyou try to stand up, the tight muscle tendons will pull on your thigh bone.  The other thing that happens is the point where the muscle merges into the tendon will be very tight and tender to touch. You aren’t having pain at your hip or thigh bone, but at the muscular point where the muscle and tendon merge.

It’s a bit confusing to describe, but you’ll find it if you sit down and put your fingers onto the tip of your pelvis, then just slide your fingers down toward your thigh and out about 2”. The point is right along the crease where your leg meets your trunk.

The muscle you are treating is the Rectus Femoris, where it merges from the tendon into the muscle fibers.  Follow this link, thigh muscle, to see the muscle and it will be a bit easier to visualize.

You need to be pressing deeply into the muscle, like you’re trying to press the bone and the muscle just happens to be in the way.  Move your fingers around a bit and you’ll find it.

Easy Treatment for Anterior Hip Pain After Sitting

relieve hip painHere is an easy treatment for hip pain after sitting you can administer yourself.  First, sit as I am, with your leg out and slightly turned.

Find the tender point with your fingers and then put your elbow into it as shown.

It’s important to have your arm opened so the point of your elbow is on top of the spasm.  It’s a bit tricky, but if you move about a bit you’ll come on to it, and it will hurt.  Keep the pressure so it’s tolerable, not excruciating.

After you have worked on this point for a few minutes you can move to the second part of the treatment.

hip pain treatmentPut the heel of your “same-side” hand onto your thigh as close to the spasm as you can get.  Lift up your fingers so the pressure is only on the heel of your hand.  You can use your opposite hand to help give more pressure.

Press down hard and deeply slide down the muscle, going toward your knee.  You can also kneed it like you would kneed bread dough, really forcing the muscle fibers to relax.

I’m putting in a picture from a previous blog to explain how you can also treat this point of your rectus femoris by using a ball on the floor.

As shown in this picture, lie on the floor with the ball on your hip muscle, and then slightly turn your body toward the floor so the ball rolls toward the front of your body. You may need to move the ball down an inch or so to get to your Rectus Femoris.

When you feel the pain, you’re on the muscle.  Just stay there for a minute or so, and if you want you can move so the ball goes along the muscle fibers all the way to your knee.

pain free living book coverIt may be a challenge to find this point, but it’s well-worth the effort!

In my book, Treat Yourself to Pain Free Living, I teach how to treat all the muscles that cause pain from your head to your feet.

Wishing you well,

Julie Donnelly

julie donnelly

About The Author

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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