Experts

 

Dr. Steve ChaneySteve Chaney, PhD

 


Dr. Steve Chaney received his BS degree in chemistry from Duke University and his PhD degree in biochemistry from UCLA.

His thesis professor, Dr. Paul Boyer, went on to win the Nobel Prize shortly after Steve left his lab. Dr. Chaney did his post graduate studies on the regulation of genetic information at the molecular level at Washington University in St. Louis.

He is currently Professor Emeritus at the University of North Carolina. At the time of his retirement he held the title of Distinguished Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics and the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina where he taught biochemistry and nutrition to first year medical and dental students for 40 years.

He has been named “Basic Science Teacher of the Year” several times by the first year medical students and was recognized with the Medical Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professorship for the period 2005 to 2009. He has been a member of UNC School of Medicine Academy of Educators since 2006, and in 2012 he was awarded the “Excellence in Teaching Lifetime Achievement Award” by the Academy of Educators.

Dr. Chaney also ran an active cancer research program for 37 years. He is internationally known for his cancer research. He helped develop a drug that represents a major advance in the treatment of colon cancer and was a featured speaker at 6 international symposia on platinum anticancer drugs.

Dr. Chaney has published over 100 papers and 12 reviews in peer-reviewed scientific journals as well as two chapters on nutrition for one of the leading biochemistry textbooks for medical students. He is also highly sought after as a speaker on the topic of holistic approaches to health.

 

 



Kai FusserKai Fusser, MS

Kai Fusser, M.S. was first introduced to the world of fitness when he was just six. His father made him a 5-pound dumbbell, fabricating it from materials at his workplace and wrapping it in electrical tape. Kai hasn’t stopped lifting weights and working out since.

But, to Kai, being physically fit is more than just working out and building muscle. It’s strengthening the muscles necessary to perform particular moves; and this is where Kai finds the marriage between fitness and golf a thing of beauty. Hitting a golf ball requires the intricate movement of muscles; and strengthening those muscles through specific exercises is a science Kai enjoys exploring … and the successes he has experienced have been great.

Kai has helped Hall of Fame golfers reach new heights, has helped turn average golfers into championship golfers, and continues to help golfers of all abilities – male and female – add power, distance, and control to their games. In fact, one of Kai’s most famous pupils – Annika Sorenstam – was looking to add to her incredible arsenal.

Annika had already established herself as the top female golfer in the world. But she wanted more distance, and more control. After meeting Kai at a local YMCA, she was convinced his methodology was the right system to follow. Less than 6-months later, Annika had gained more than 20-yards with her driver, and improved her accuracy. The result? In 2002, Annika put together one of the greatest seasons in the history of golf, winning 13 tournaments. In 2003, she played against the men at Colonial and had no problem keeping up with them.

Overall, golfers who have worked with Kai, including, Graeme McDowell, Jonas Blixt, Anna Nordqvist, Karen Stupples and Batrice Recari, have won more than a dozen majors and over 100 tournaments worldwide. And, Kai has helped professional and amateur athletes in other sports as well. In fact, water skiers and wake boarders whom Kai has worked with have also won more than 100 championships including several in the X-Games and Gravity-Games. Former NBA All-Star Grant Hill and 1998 Indianapolis 500 Champion Eddie Cheever also turned to Kai for fitness.

Today, Kai runs the golf fitness program at the Annika Academy ™ and helps all golfers improve their game without ever placing a golf club in their hands. He does it through a fitness routine that is proven and tested to work. Featured in such publications as Golf Digest, Golf Magazine, the USA Today, Golf Fitness Magazine, and more. Kai’s philosophy is “efficiency through perfect movement” … and in the golf swing, this means, it’s the sum of all muscles in our body working together at the right time, and the right volume. This ensures great efficiency as the loads on the body are distributed throughout the whole system, every muscle does its part, and they all help each other.

 



Julie DonnellyJulie Donnelly

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

Her training began as a massage therapist, licensed in the State of New York where the initial requirement was 650 hours of classroom study in topics such as Anatomy & Physiology, Kinesiology, Pathology of Muscles, Medical Massage, and Eastern Theory. She spent hundreds of hours focusing on an understanding of why muscles cause pain that may be far removed from the actual source of the problem, and why conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome exist.

She has also received advanced training from a doctor of osteopathy, a physical therapist, a therapeutic massage therapist and from other professionals involved with just about every form of muscular training. This diverse exposure widened the scope of her practice far beyond spa massage and was the solid foundation of everything she does now. Unlike relaxing massage which has its own benefits, her work focuses on the deep muscles that hold joints bound, preventing full range-of-motion and causing chronic joint pain.

In 1989 she began working with individuals who were suffering from chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She quickly began working with serious athletes, many of them endurance athletes that compete in races with such grueling events as the Century Marathons (actually running 100 miles!), the Race Across America (RAAM) where an athlete cycles from San Diego to Atlantic City, NJ in just 8 days, and Ironman Triathlons which combine 2 ½ miles swimming, 112 miles cycling and then finishing off with 26.2 miles running.

From her work with endurance athletes, serious local athletes, and people who were suffering from a wide assortment of chronic joint pains, the Julstro techniques of self-treatment developed. Expanding her teaching with the addition of the self-treatment concept really separates her from the majority of her peers. She found that as she began to teach people how to help-themselves they could continue their therapy outside of their session with her.

In 1993 she opened her first Julstro Muscular Therapy Center. Her message to her clients is this: “When you come to visit me, I’ll work on your muscles, release the knots that are holding the muscles short and putting pressure on your nerves and joints, and then I’ll teach YOU how to do simple treatments that will help you when you are at home. That is my promise to you!”

But if you cannot travel, she has made her self-treatment techniques available worldwide by way of http://www.julstro.com where you will find information on the Julstro™ Self–Treatment System. You may also be interested in her series of Pain–Free Books which share the Julstro™ techniques in a clear, concise manner.

Finally, if you would like to receive an informative newsletter about how to prevent or reverse the aches and pains related to sciatica, low back syndrome, shoulder–hip–knee pain, or any other repetitive strain injury, you can subscribe now at http://www.julstro.com.

 



Dr Pierre DuboisPierre-Yves Duboi MD

 


Dr. Pierre-Yves Dubois is a Swiss Physician, and a former martial artist brings a new holistic health concept to his practice and was named an “America’s Top Chiropractor 2009”.

• The Durham chiropractor explains that In Switzerland, chiropractic is a medical profession regulated on the same federal level as medical doctors, veterinarians, dentists and pharmacists.

• As every Swiss chiropractor he undergoes six years of undergraduate basic studies followed by a minimum of two years of post graduate program regulated by the Swiss Medical Law MedBG/LPmed.

 


 

Recent Videos From Dr. Steve Chaney

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Latest Article

Calf Cramps Remedy

Posted February 20, 2018 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Don’t Let A Leg Cramp Stop You Short

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT – The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

calf cramps remedyGetting a leg cramp while you are running can be the “straw that broke the camel’s back.”  If you don’t treat it properly and quickly when it is happening, you may limp to the finish line, and you can suffer from its effects for days afterward.  I will show you the best calf cramps remedy below.  First, let’s go over spasms and muscle cramps.

A spasm and a cramp are similar because it’s a shortening in the muscle fiber, but that’s where the similarity ends. A spasm is a slow-forming shortening of a group of fibers that tie up into a knot in the muscle. You can feel a spasm with your fingertips, it feels like a bump as you slide along the full length of the muscle. With a spasm, as you press down and slide, it doesn’t hurt until you get to the spasm, and then it can really hurt. But then it stops hurting as you slide off the spasm. A spasm refers pain to the insertion points of the muscle and frequently doesn’t hurt where the spasm has formed (that is, until you press on it).

Why Do Your Muscles Cramp?

calf cramps remedy muscle crampsA cramp (Charlie horse) is when all the fibers of the entire muscle suddenly and violently contract. The muscle will quickly shorten and can go into a huge knot, or it will just totally shorten.

Usually a cramp happens in your calf muscle, although it can happen to any muscle in the body.  Your calf is comprised of two major muscles, the gastrocnemius and soleus. The gastrocnemius, which is shown in this graphic, originates behind your knee and inserts into your Achilles tendon.

Visualize the muscle suddenly shortening, pulling up on your Achilles tendon, and becoming a mass of tight knots through the entire muscle.

Muscles have an “all or nothing” response.  This means that when a muscle fiber contracts, it will shorten 100% of its length.  It never starts to shorten and then make a U-turn and lengthen.  A cramp is seriously painful, and if you try to stretch it out as it’s happening, you can tear the muscle fibers. In fact, that’s the reason it hurts for sometimes days after the cramp.

A Calf Cramps Remedy You Can Administer Yourself

calf cramps remedy squeezeThe best thing to do is to squeeze the two ends of your calf muscle together, which will help the cramp complete as quickly as possible. This will hurt, but for less time than the normal cramping process.  Hold your calf tightly, as shown in this picture, and continue to press the two ends toward each other.

Hold it until you can breathe normally (about 30-45 seconds), and then release. Breathe for a minute or so, and then push the two ends together again.  This second time won’t hurt, you are only doing it to make sure that all the fibers have completed the contraction.

calf cramps remedy hold sittingOnce you have stopped the cramp, don’t stretch…yet. You need to flush out the hydrogen ions (AKA lactic acid) that rapidly built-up in the muscle during the cramp.

There are many ways to self-treat your calf. If you are out on the road you can either sit on a bench or lie on the ground and put the sore calf onto your opposite knee.  Press down and hold the pressure for 30 seconds. Then deeply press along the muscle going from the back of your knee toward your ankle.

calf cramps remedy opposite footYou can also use your opposite heel and press deeply, straight into your calf.

Start at the top of the muscle and move down toward your ankle. Stop whenever you come to a point that is especially painful. The point should be close to the area shown in this picture.

Hold the pressure for 30-60 seconds, or until it doesn’t hurt anymore.  Release, and then repeat 2-3 times.

Complete this self-treatment by squeezing your calf muscle, like you are wringing out a wet towel.  This will force blood into your muscle and get your circulation moving again.

Proof That My Treatments Work

I once taught this technique at an Ironman Triathlon during a 15-minute session I was giving to the triathletes.  Several days later a triathlete emailed me and told me that he had a cramp as he was running, and he did the treatment I’d taught him.  It cost him a few minutes (he wasn’t in the top three, so the time loss wasn’t a huge issue) but he was able to get up and get back to running, totally without pain.

About a mile later he got a cramp in the other leg, but he automatically started to just stretch it like he’d always done before.  He ended up limping all the way to the finish line, and days later it was still hurting.  He wanted to let me know that my cramp treatment really worked great.  This was especially helpful because I’d always wondered what body chemistry did to the outcome of treating a cramp, and here I found out that chemistry wasn’t involved in the treatment of the muscle fibers.

What To Do After The Calf Cramps Remedy

If the cramp happens during a race or athletic event, knowing how to stop it, and these quick massage techniques, will get you back into the game. But it hasn’t totally resolved the issue. Finally, when you have the time to be detailed (after the race, in the evening, etc.), it is important to work out all the spasms and then stretch properly.

When you are treating the muscles afterward, I suggest you consider getting an analgesic cream that goes way deep into the muscle fibers. Use it when you are massaging the muscle, but don’t put it on before you play, run, or before/after a shower because it will go too deep into the muscle and burn like crazy. After you do the treatments, use ice &/or arnica gel (get it at a good health food store) to heal the bruised muscle fibers and help with pain and swelling. Arnica is fantastic, it’s an amazing homeopathic remedy that has been around for ages and really works.

Naturally you will also want to make sure you hydrate properly and that your diet, vitamins and minerals are all in balance.

calf cramps remedy bookCramping is a common problem athletes face, but with a little bit of effort you can prevent muscle injury and get back in the race quickly!

You can find the full treatments for your muscle cramps by going to my book, Treat Yourself to Pain-Free Living . This book has treatments for your entire body, from your head to your feet.  YOU are your own Best Therapist!  Stop pain quickly and easily with self-treatments you can do anytime, anyplace.

Wishing you well,

Julie Donnelly

julie donnelly

About The Author

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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