Folic Acid vs. Folate

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in current health articles, folic acid vs. folate, Health Current Events

Are Supplement Manufacturers Trying to Mislead You?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

folic acid vs. folate questionThere has been much confusion on folic acid vs. folate.  For example, I recently received this question from a reader:

“I have gotten so much clarification about folic acid from your video – thank you!
But I have another question I was hoping you could answer.

When a supplement label states there is “folate” rather than “folic acid”, is there really a difference between the two? I hear women telling each other to only use the one that says folate because it’s made from food. And folic acid isn’t. These women are also paying more money for these products because of this. Is this true? (And I’m not talking about tetrahydrafolate, either)
I’ve been told by one manufacturer that they label it as folic acid, but they know other companies who use the exact same source of folic acid.  Still,  they put folate on their label, possibly to avoid controversy.
Are these women being duped? Should they be asking the manufacturer certain questions for clarification?”

The video, this reader is referring to is my “The Truth About Methyl Folate” video in which I debunk the many myths about methyl folate circulating on the internet, and, unfortunately, repeated by some doctors.

However, the reader is correct. I did not address the folic acid vs. folate nomenclature in that video. I will attempt to clarify it in this article.

Folic Acid vs. Folate

A Rose By Any Other Name

roseI call this section “A Rose By Any Other Name” from the famous Shakespeare quote from Romeo and Juliet “A rose by any other names would smell as sweet”.

Biochemists and nutritionists use the terms folic acid and folate interchangeably. There is a sound chemical rationale for that.

Folic acid has a glutamic acid residue on one end. Thus, folic acid is what chemists refer to as an organic acid, specifically a carboxylic acid. Under acidic conditions the appropriate suffix for an organic acid is “ic”. However, under neutral or alkaline conditions, organic acids lose their protons. Once that happens, the appropriate suffix is “ate”.

The exact pH of vitamin pills may vary from brand to brand. In our body our stomach is acidic, our intestines are alkaline, and our blood and cells are normally near neutral. Thus, vitamin B9 could correctly be labeled either folic acid or folate in supplements. It will be folic acid in our stomach and will be folate in our intestines, bloodstream, and cells.  Beginning to see the difference between folic acid vs. folate?

The bottom line is that nobody is trying to trick you by using the term folate for the vitamin B9 on their supplement label. Furthermore, whether the label says folic acid or folate, the actual vitamin B9 will be in both the folic acid and folate form as it travels through your body.

In answer to your other question, since folic acid and folate are two names for the same molecule, folate is not more natural than folic acid. If someone is charging you extra because they use the term folate on their label, they are ripping you off.

 

What About Tetrahydrofolate?

uderstanding folic acid vs. folateThe person who sent me the question also asked about tetrahydrofolates.  Here the story gets a bit murkier.  As folic acid or folate enters our cells, three things immediately happen:

  • It is reduced to tetrahydrofolate. That terminology simply means that 4 hydrogens have been added to the molecule.
  • A string of glutamic acid residues is added. That traps it inside the cells.
  • It is converted to a half dozen different derivatives that play important metabolic roles in the cell. N5-methyltetrahydrofolate (commonly referred to as methyl folate) is one of these metabolically active compounds.

This is where it gets confusing. Nutritionists also refer to all of these tetrahydrofolate derivatives as folates. My guess is that years ago some genius must have decided that the term tetrahydrofolate was too long and complicated for the general public.

In my view lumping everything together under the term folate has turned out to be more confusing in the long run. However, I do have the advantage of hindsight.  It’s easy to point out mistakes after they are made.

However, this is where all of the confusion arises.  It’s because the term folate can mean so many different things.  Here are a few fast facts to help clarify the confusion.

  • Folates in food are in the tetrahydrofolate form. Tetrahydrofolate in foods is, in fact, more natural than folic acid or folate in supplements. However, tetrahydrofolates in foods are utilized only about half as well as folic acid or folate in supplements. In addition, most of us don’t eat enough high-folate foods.
  • In contrast, tetrahydrofolate in a supplement is not more natural than folic acid. That’s because:
  • It would require one cup of lentils or two cups of spinach to provide the RDA level of tetrahydrofolate in a single vitamin tablet. That’s just one tablet.  You do the math!  If someone tells you that the folate in their supplement came from foods, they will lie to you about other things as well.
  • In fact, the tetrahydrofolate found in supplements is chemically synthesized from folic acid. It can never be more natural than folic acid.
  • Supplements containing tetrahydrofolate are no better utilized than supplements containing folic acid when you measure their ability to increase cellular tetrahydrofolate levels (the only measure that really matters).

The bottom line is that even if folate on the label were to refer to tetrahydrofolate, it is not from food.  It is not more natural than folic acid.  It is not better utilized than folic acid.  If someone is charging you a higher price for that supplement, they are ripping you off.

 

Debunking The Methyl Folate Myths

mythsMethyl folate has become an internet sensation.  If you believe all the hype, everyone should be using supplements containing methyl folate rather than folic acid.  In fact, some of the claims made by manufacturers who sell methyl folate supplements are downright deceptive.

Unfortunately, there are even medical doctors touting the wonders of methyl folate and offering all sorts of plausible sounding biochemical explanations about why it is superior to folic acid.  My take on that is that I try not to practice medicine when I write my articles.  I have neither the training nor the degree to do that.  In turn, I would ask medical doctors to stop trying to practice biochemistry.

As I said at the beginning of this article, I have produced a video, “The Truth About Methyl Folate,” in which I debunk all the many methyl folate myths circulating on the internet. If you would like the “Cliff Notes” version, here it is:

  • Supplements containing methyl folate do not get their methyl folate from foods.
  • Methyl folate in supplements is chemically synthesized and is not more natural than folic acid.
  • Folic acid and methyl folate in supplements are equally well utilized by the body, even in individuals with a MTHFR deficiency.
  • Excess folic acid does not cause cancer.

If you would like the science and the references behind those statements, I invite you to view my video.
metho folate
I hope you now understand folic acid vs. folates.  If not, please feel free to reach out to me.

 

The Bottom Line

  • A reader recently asked me to clear up the confusion about why the terms folic acid vs. folate are used interchangeably on supplement labels to describe vitamin B9.
  • That terminology is based on simple chemistry.  Folic acid and folate are two names for the same molecule. Under acidic conditions, it is called folic acid. Under neutral or alkaline conditions, it is called folate.
  • Since folic acid and folate are two names for the same molecule, folate is not more natural than folic acid.  If someone is charging you extra because they use the term folate on their label, they are ripping you off.
  • In the cell folate is reduced to tetrahydrofolate and a number of metabolically active derivatives of tetrahydrofolate are formed. Unfortunately, these compounds are also referred to as folates. This terminology has a historical basis rather than a chemical basis and is confusing.
  • If you see the term tetrahydrofolate on your supplement label,  you need to know that it is not from food.  It is not more natural than folic acid.  It is not better utilized than folic acid.  If someone is charging you a higher price for that supplement, they are also ripping you off.
  • I have produced a video called “The Truth About Methyl Folate” to debunk the many methyl folate myths on the internet. In the article above, you will find the “Cliff Notes” version of the video.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Comments (2)

  • Peggy Turcott

    |

    Dear Mr Chaney,
    I am new 2 ur Health Tips emails. They r very educational. Thank you 4 the benefit of ur time consuming reports. I do have a suggestion, if u dont mind. It would take less sheets of paper & look more professional if u created them in Word using full width of sheets. Then send as attachments so when we open & print it won’t have email appearance if senders name, date, receivers email address & subject line. When printing sometimes there is a 3.5″ white space boarder on R side & a 1″ white space boarder on L side there pushing the words to the middle page using more sheets of paper because the words don’t spread out 2 both the sides leaving only a 1/2 boarder. Thank u 4 reading & possibly considering my suggestion 4 a more professional look but also 2 save us pages. I print & have handy 2 show 2 clients.

    Reply

    • Dr. Steve Chaney

      |

      Dear Peggy,
      If you click on the link included with each email, it will take you directly to that article on my website. You can share the link with anyone and print out the article full size if you would like to.
      Dr. Chaney

      Reply

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Posted November 21, 2017 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Epsom Salt – An Inexpensive “Miracle Cure”

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT – The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

epsom salt bath for sore musclesAn Epsom Salt bath for sore muscles is an old remedy that until recently has been overlooked by modern medicine. For hundreds of years people have used Epsom salt baths for relieving sore muscles, healing cuts, drawing out inflammation, and treating colds.  To many people this has long been a miracle cure, the first “go-to” for pain relief. Research has proven why Epsom Salt works so well, and how to use it so you benefit the most.

Why An Epsom Salt Bath for Sore Muscles Works

Epsom Salt is a combination of magnesium and sulfate. When you are under stress – and who doesn’t have stress in their life – your body becomes depleted in magnesium. Magnesium is a key component in a mood-elevating chemical of the brain called serotonin. Serotonin creates relaxation and a feeling of calm, so it reduces stress, helps you sleep better, improves your ability to concentrate, and lessens the tension of irritability.  It is also a component in the production of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which produces energy for the cells.

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Massage and Epsom Salt – a “Marriage Made in Heaven!”

Every month I explain how massaging one area of your body will help eliminate or reduce pain. My book (see below) teaches many self-treatments for a long list of aches and pains. Massage has been proven to help with:

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Massage will also force toxins out of your muscles and improve circulation.  Epsom Salt baths are beneficial after a massage because it will remove the toxins out of the body. In the past I had heard that a 15-minute bath was sufficient, but that has changed.  Recently I read an article that explained it takes 40 minutes of soaking to make the transfer complete. Toxins are drawn out and magnesium enters into the body

Self-Massage is Convenient and Easy-to-Do

It’s wonderful to go to a qualified massage therapist and relax while the spasms are worked out of your muscles. However, if you have a stressful job or you love to exercise, you can’t go to a therapist as frequently as you should.  That’s where self-massage becomes a life-saver.

pain free living book coverBefore relaxing in your Epsom salt bath, do the techniques demonstrated in my book, “Treat Yourself to Pain-Free Living” to release the spasms that are causing joint and muscle pain.

As you untie the “knots,” you are releasing toxins into your blood stream and lymphatic system.  A relaxing, 40-minute soak in a tub of comfortably hot water and 2 cups of Epsom Salt will eliminate the toxins from your body.

Life is more stressful than ever before, and you deserve a relaxing break.  Massage and Epsom Salt baths are the perfect beginning to a restful night’s sleep!  Plus, the benefits of both massage and Epsom Salt will improve your health and vitality.

Wishing you well,

Julie Donnelly

 

About The Author

julie donnelly

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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