Frozen Shoulder Pain Relief

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Shoulder Pain

Frozen Shoulder, Rotator Cuff Pain, No More!

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT –The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

frozen shoulder pain reliefA frozen shoulder is a mild sounding name for a seriously painful condition that prevents your shoulder and arm from moving. Muscles in your entire shoulder are responsible for frozen shoulder and rotator cuff injuries. Each one needs to be treated for relief, and each impacts the others so it’s important to treat all of them to achieve frozen shoulder pain relief.

Last month I showed you how to do the treatment for the Infraspinatus muscle in the back of your shoulder. This month we’ll talk about two muscles in your chest that prevent your arm from going back.

Muscles that Cause Frozen Shoulder and Rotator Cuff Injuries

The muscles are your Pectoralis Minor and Pectoralis Major which are on the front of your shoulder. If you put your hand on your chest as shown, you are right on top of both muscles.  You can also move your hand down a bit to treat the rest of the two muscles.

frozen shoulder pain relief treatmentThe deeper muscle is your Pectoralis Minor which goes from your ribs up to the top of your shoulder. This muscle pulls your shoulder forward and causes your back to round. When it is in spasm, you have poor posture and can’t bring your shoulder back.

The surface muscle is your Pectoralis Major which goes from your chest bone (sternum) to your upper arm. When this muscle contracts normally, you bring your arm in toward your trunk and/or across the front of your body. If it is in spasm, you can’t bring your arm out away from your body.

You can see how these two muscles will cause frozen shoulder by holding your arm tight to your body.

Since they both move your shoulder and arm, while they aren’t technically rotator cuff muscles, they impact your rotator cuff.  So, these muscles have to be addressed as well for frozen shoulder pain relief.

Frozen Shoulder Pain Relief Treatment and Rotator Cuff Injury Treatment

Place your opposite hand onto your chest as shown.  For example, if you are treating your left shoulder, you will put your right hand on the bottom. Press your fingertips into your chest and place your left hand on top of your right hand.  Press into the muscles with both hands to add strength to the movement.

pain free dvdIf you don’t feel the tender point at first, just move your fingertips around and keep pressing.  When you hit a sore point, you are on top of the spasm. Hold the pressure for 30 seconds and repeat. Do this 2-3 times, and then look for another tender point.

It is most beneficial if you combine this treatment with the treatment for the Infraspinatus that was shown previously.

There are so many shoulder treatments involved in the release of frozen shoulder and rotator cuff injuries that I can’t show all of them. If you suffer from shoulder pain or limited flexibility, I suggest you look at my book Treat Yourself to Pain-Free Living. This book will help you with frozen shoulder pain relief.

Wishing you well,

Julie Donnelly

 

 

About The Author

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

julie donnellyShe has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Latest Article

Relieve Hip Pain After Sitting or Driving

Posted June 20, 2017 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Relief is Just a Few Movements Away!

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT – The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

relieve hip pain after sittingI’m on a long business trip, speaking and teaching in Tennessee and New York, and the drive from Sarasota, FL meant many hours of driving over several days.  One of my stops was to visit with Suzanne and Dr. Steve Chaney at their home in North Carolina.  It was that long drive that became the inspiration for this blog.

After all those hours of driving, my hip was really sore. It was painful to stand up. While talking to Suzanne and Dr. Chaney I was using my elbow to work on the sore area, and when we were discussing the blog for this month it only made sense to share this technique with you.  So, Dr. Chaney took pictures and I sat at his computer to write.  I thought others may want to how to relieve hip pain after sitting or driving for long periods.

What Causes Anterior Hip Pain?

As I’ve mentioned in posts in the past, sitting is the #1 cause of low back pain, and it also causes anterior hip pain (pain localized towards the front of the hip) because the muscles (psoas and iliacus) pass through the hip and insert into the tendons that then insert into the top of the thigh bone.  When hip pain reliefyou try to stand up, the tight muscle tendons will pull on your thigh bone.  The other thing that happens is the point where the muscle merges into the tendon will be very tight and tender to touch. You aren’t having pain at your hip or thigh bone, but at the muscular point where the muscle and tendon merge.

It’s a bit confusing to describe, but you’ll find it if you sit down and put your fingers onto the tip of your pelvis, then just slide your fingers down toward your thigh and out about 2”. The point is right along the crease where your leg meets your trunk.

The muscle you are treating is the Rectus Femoris, where it merges from the tendon into the muscle fibers.  Follow this link, thigh muscle, to see the muscle and it will be a bit easier to visualize.

You need to be pressing deeply into the muscle, like you’re trying to press the bone and the muscle just happens to be in the way.  Move your fingers around a bit and you’ll find it.

Easy Treatment for Anterior Hip Pain After Sitting

relieve hip painHere is an easy treatment for hip pain after sitting you can administer yourself.  First, sit as I am, with your leg out and slightly turned.

Find the tender point with your fingers and then put your elbow into it as shown.

It’s important to have your arm opened so the point of your elbow is on top of the spasm.  It’s a bit tricky, but if you move about a bit you’ll come on to it, and it will hurt.  Keep the pressure so it’s tolerable, not excruciating.

After you have worked on this point for a few minutes you can move to the second part of the treatment.

hip pain treatmentPut the heel of your “same-side” hand onto your thigh as close to the spasm as you can get.  Lift up your fingers so the pressure is only on the heel of your hand.  You can use your opposite hand to help give more pressure.

Press down hard and deeply slide down the muscle, going toward your knee.  You can also kneed it like you would kneed bread dough, really forcing the muscle fibers to relax.

I’m putting in a picture from a previous blog to explain how you can also treat this point of your rectus femoris by using a ball on the floor.

As shown in this picture, lie on the floor with the ball on your hip muscle, and then slightly turn your body toward the floor so the ball rolls toward the front of your body. You may need to move the ball down an inch or so to get to your Rectus Femoris.

When you feel the pain, you’re on the muscle.  Just stay there for a minute or so, and if you want you can move so the ball goes along the muscle fibers all the way to your knee.

pain free living book coverIt may be a challenge to find this point, but it’s well-worth the effort!

In my book, Treat Yourself to Pain Free Living, I teach how to treat all the muscles that cause pain from your head to your feet.

Wishing you well,

Julie Donnelly

julie donnelly

About The Author

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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