The Mediterranean Diet For Heart Health

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Mediterranean diet

Can You Cut Your Heart Disease Risk In Half?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

what ifShould you use the Mediterranean diet for heart health?

What if…

  • You could reduce your risk of heart disease by almost 50%…and…
  • It didn’t cost you an extra penny?
  • You didn’t need to lose weight (although you would probably get even better results if you did)?
  • You didn’t need to buy a gym membership and start a workout program (although you would probably get even better results if you did)?
  • There were absolutely no side effects?
  • There were considerable side benefits like reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, inflammation, and cognitive decline as you aged?

Would you be interested? I’m willing to bet if this were a TV ad, you would be on the edge of your seat. If it were a new “magic” supplement, you might be reaching for your credit card before the ad was over. If it was the latest “miracle” workout machine, you might order it right away.

However, I am not talking about a magic pill or a miracle workout machine. I’m talking about a way of eating called the Mediterranean diet. Recent headlines have claimed that the Mediterranean diet can cut heart disease risk almost in half. This would lead you to believe you could use the Mediterranean diet for heart health.  Let’s look at the evidence behind that claim.

 

How Was The Study Designed?

omega-3 lowers heart disease riskThe study behind the headlines (C-M. Kastorini et al. Atherosclerosis, 246: 87-93, 2016) enrolled 2583 adults, ages 18-89, from the region around Athens, Greece in a 10-year study beginning in 2001-2002.

At the beginning of the study and at the 5 and 10-year mark, participants completed in-depth surveys about their medical records, lifestyle, and dietary habits. These surveys were conducted by trained personnel (cardiologists, general practitioners, dietitians, and nurses). Participants with active cardiovascular disease in the first survey were excluded from the study.

The study evaluated 4 things:

  • Cardiovascular disease risk factors including obesity, high cholesterol, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, diabetes, and inflammation.
  • Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (see below).
  • Heart disease incidence based on heart attacks, stroke, angina, ischemia, cardiac arrhythmias and deaths due to heart disease.
  • Confounding variables such as age, sex, family history of heart disease, smoking, and lack of physical activity. All comparisons were corrected for these confounding variables so that they did not influence the results.

Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was based on a diet analysis scoring system called MedDietScore. The Mediterranean diet is one which emphasizes fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, fish, olive oil, and moderate consumption of red wine.  You can see this might lead you to believe in the Mediterranean diet for heart health.

The MedDietScore gives positive points based on how often these foods are consumed. It gives negative points based on how often meats, meat products, poultry, and full-fat dairy products are consumed. For alcohol, modest consumption is considered a positive, with either no or excess alcohol consumption rating a score of 0. The composite score ranges from 0 to 55, with higher values indicating greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet.

As an aside, you might think that everyone in Greece consumes a Mediterranean diet. Unfortunately, our unhealthy Western diet and our fast foods restaurants are making inroads in the birthplace of the Mediterranean diet.

 

The Mediterranean Diet for Heart Health?

Mediterranean diet for heart healthEven after correcting for confounding variables, the study results were impressive.

  • Each 10% increase in adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with a 15% decreased risk of developing heart disease during the 10-year study period.
  • When they compared participants in the upper third for adherence to the Mediterranean diet to those in the lower third, their risk of developing heart disease was decreased by 47%. That’s huge.

However, the results were even more impressive when they looked at the effects of the Mediterranean diet on other risk factors for heart disease.

  • For individuals with low adherence to the Mediterranean diet, each of those risk factors (obesity, high cholesterol, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, diabetes, and inflammation) independently increased the risk of developing heart disease. These results are identical to almost every other published study looking at those risk factors.
  • However, for individuals with high adherence to the Mediterranean diet, those same risk factors had only small, non-significant effects on the risk of developing heart disease. If this finding is verified by future studies, it would suggest that adherence to a Mediterranean diet has the potential to override risk factors like obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol.

Of course, I would not recommend that you ignore obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors and just focus on following a Mediterranean diet. I’m pretty sure you will get even better results if you get your weight, blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure under control in addition to following a Mediterranean diet. Who knows, you might even reduce your risk of heart disease by 75% or more.  So, should we believe in the Mediterranean diet for heart health?

What Does This Mean For You?

If this were the only published study showing that adherence to the Mediterranean diet reduces heart disease risk I would consider it speculative. However, it is only one of several recent studies that have come to a similar conclusion. At this point in time, the evidence is strong that following a Mediterranean-type diet will reduce your heart disease risk.  The Mediterranean diet for heart health seems to be true.

That brings me back to my opening statement. Following a Mediterranean diet:

  • Won’t cost you a penny. You are just spending your food budget on healthier foods.
  • May reduce your risk of heart disease by up to 47% even if you don’t lose weight, but I recommend that you do lose weight.
  • May be as effective as exercise at reducing your heart disease risk. That statement comes from a talk given by one of the authors when he was describing the study.
  • Has no side effects. You could probably achieve a 47% reduction in heart disease using a cardiologist-approved cocktail of 3-5 drugs, but those drugs would come with significant side effects and a considerable cost for someone.
  • Will likely come with side benefits like reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, inflammation, and cognitive decline.

My question to you is: Now that you know that a simple dietary change could have all those benefits and no downside, are you willing to give it a try? If so, your heart may just thank you for it.

However, I don’t mean to imply that the Mediterranean diet is the only way to reduce your heart disease risk. If your blood pressure is elevated, you might want to try the DASH diet . If you want to reduce heart disease risk and also minimize cognitive decline as you age, you might want to consider the MIND diet .

Those three diets are actually quite similar. They all emphasize fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, fish, and moderate amounts of healthy fats. They all minimize refined flour, pastries, sweets, red & processed meats. You won’t find a Twinkie or a Big Mac in any of them.

The Mediterranean diet for heart health?  Sure!

The Bottom Line

 

  • A recent study suggests that adherence to a Mediterranean type diet could reduce the risk of developing heart disease by up to 47%.
  • The beneficial effect of the Mediterranean diet was so strong that it overcame other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, high cholesterol, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, diabetes, and inflammation.
  • This study is likely to be accurate because it is fully consistent with several other studies looking at the effect of the Mediterranean diet on heart disease risk.
  • To put it into perspective, this simple dietary change.
    • Won’t cost you a penny. You just redirect your food budget.
    • Has zero side effects. You could probably achieve a similar 47% reduction in heart disease risk with a cardiologist-approved cocktail of 3-5 drugs, but that would come with multiple side effects.
    • Has side benefits such as reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, inflammation, and cognitive decline
  • However, the Mediterranean diet is not the only game in town. Other studies suggest that the DASH diet and MIND diet are also effective at reducing heart disease risk.
  • Those three diet patterns (Mediterranean, DASH & MIND) are actually quite similar. They all emphasize fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, fish, and moderate amounts of healthy fats. They all minimize refined flour, pastries, sweets, red & processed meats. You won’t find a Twinkie or a Big Mac in any of them.
  • Finally, I am not suggesting that you go on the one of these diets and just throw away your heart medicines without talking to your doctor. However, I would recommend that you talk with your doctor about implementing what the National Institutes of Health calls Therapeutic Lifestyle Change. All three dietary patterns are fully consistent with the NIH-recommended Therapeutic Lifestyle Change. The NIH recommends that Therapeutic Lifestyle Change be tried before considering cholesterol lowering drugs or be used along with cholesterol lowering drugs so that drug dosage can be minimized.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Comments (2)

  • Louise Levesque

    |

    Thank you for your article on the Mediterranean Diet. I suffer from high blood pressure and high cholesterol, so I am a prime candidate for heart disease. These three diets will help me avoid heart disease. Is there anything I can change in my diet to avoid strokes?

    Reply

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Latest Article

Does Magnesium Optimize Vitamin D Levels?

Posted February 12, 2019 by Dr. Steve Chaney

The Case For Holistic Supplementation

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

Does magnesium optimize vitamin D levels?

magnesium optimize vitamin dOne of the great mysteries about vitamin D is the lack of correlation between vitamin D intake and blood levels of its active metabolite, 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Many people who consume RDA levels of vitamin D from foods and/or supplements end up with low blood levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The reason(s) for this discrepancy between intake of vitamin D and blood levels of its active metabolite are not currently understood.

Another great mystery is why it has been so difficult to demonstrate benefits of vitamin D supplementation. Association studies show a strong correlation between optimal 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and reduced risk of heart disease, cancer, and other diseases. However, placebo-controlled clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation have often come up empty. Until recently, many of those studies did not measure 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Could it be that optimal levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were not achieved?

The authors of the current study hypothesized that optimal magnesium status might be required for vitamin D conversion to its active form. You are probably wondering why magnesium would influence vitamin D metabolism. I had the same question.

The authors pointed out that:

  • Magnesium status affects the activities of enzymes involved in both the synthesis and degradation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D.
  • Some clinical studies have suggested that magnesium intake interacts with vitamin D intake in affecting health outcomes.
  • If the author’s hypothesis is correct, it is a concern because magnesium deficiency is prevalent in this country. In their “Fact Sheet For Health Professionals,” the NIH states that “…a majority of Americans of all ages ingest less magnesium from food than their respective EARs [Estimated Average Requirement]; adult men aged 71 years and older and adolescent females are most likely to have low intakes.” Other sources have indicated that magnesium deficiency may approach 70-80% for adults over 70.

If the author’s hypothesis that magnesium is required for vitamin D activation is correct and most Americans are deficient in magnesium, this raises some troubling questions.

  • Most vitamin D supplements do not contain magnesium. If people aren’t getting supplemental magnesium from another source, they may not be optimally utilizing the vitamin D in the supplements.
  • Most clinical studies involving vitamin D do not also include magnesium. If most of the study participants are deficient in magnesium, it might explain why it has been so difficult to show benefits from vitamin D supplementation.

Thus the authors devised a study (Q Dai et al, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 108: 1249-1258, 2018 ) to directly test their hypothesis.

 

How Was The Study Designed?

magnesium optimize vitamin d studyThe authors recruited 180 volunteers, aged 40-85, from an ongoing study on the prevention of colon cancer being conducted at Vanderbilt University. The duration of the study was 12 weeks. Blood was drawn at the beginning of the study to measure baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Three additional blood draws to determine 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were performed at weeks 1, 6, and 12.

Because high blood calcium levels increase excretion of magnesium, the authors individualized magnesium intake based on “optimizing” the calcium to magnesium ratio in the diet rather than giving everyone the same amount of magnesium. The dietary calcium to magnesium ratio for most Americans is 2.6 to 1 or higher. Based on their previous work, they considered an “ideal” calcium to magnesium ratio to be 2.3 to 1. The mean daily dose of magnesium supplementation in this study was 205 mg, with a range from 77 to 390 mg to achieve the “ideal” calcium to magnesium ratio. The placebo was an identical gel capsule containing microcrystalline cellulose.

Two 24-hour dietary recalls were conducted at baseline to determine baseline dietary intake of calcium and magnesium. Four additional 24-hour dietary recalls were performed during the 12-week study to assure that calcium intake was unchanged and the calcium to magnesium ratio of 2.3 to 1 was achieved.

In short this was a small study, but it was very well designed to test the author’s hypothesis.

 

Does Magnesium Optimize Vitamin D Levels?

 

does magnesium optimize vitamin d levelsThis was a very complex study, so I am simplifying it for this discussion. For full details, I refer you to the journal article (Q Dai et al, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 108: 1249-1258, 2018).

The most significant finding was that magnesium supplementation did affect blood levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. However, the effect of magnesium supplementation varied depending on the baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D level at the beginning of the study.

  • When the baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D was 20 ng/ml or less (which the NIH considers inadequate), magnesium supplementation had no effect on 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.
  • When the baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D was 20-30 ng/ml (which the NIH considers the lower end of the adequate range), magnesium supplementation increased 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.
  • When the baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D level approached 50 ng/ml (which the NIH says may be “associated with adverse effects”), magnesium supplementation lowered 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

The simplest interpretation of these results is:

  • When vitamin D intake is inadequate, magnesium cannot magically create 25-hydroxyvitamin D from thin air.
  • When vitamin D intake is adequate, magnesium can enhance the conversion of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D.
  • When vitamin D intake is too high, magnesium can help protect you by lowering 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

The authors concluded: “Our findings suggest that optimal magnesium status may be important for optimizing 25-hydroxyvitamin D status. Further dosing studies are warranted…”

 

What Does This Study Mean For You?

magnesium optimize vitamin d for youThis was a groundbreaking study that has provided novel and interesting results.

  • It provides the first evidence that optimal magnesium status may be required for optimizing the conversion of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D.
  • It suggests that optimal magnesium status can help normalize 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels by increasing low levels and decreasing high levels.

However, this was a small study and, like any groundbreaking study, has significant limitations. For a complete discussion of the limitations and strengths of this study I refer you to the editorial (S Lin and Q Liu, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 108: 1159-1161, 2018) that accompanied the study.

In summary, this study needs to be replicated by larger clinical studies with a more diverse study population. In order to provide meaningful results, those studies would need to carefully control and monitor calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D intake. There is also a need for mechanistic studies to better understand how magnesium can both increase low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and decrease high 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

However, assuming the conclusions of this study to be true, it has some interesting implications:

  • If you are taking a vitamin D supplement, you should probably make sure that you are also getting the DV (400 mg) of magnesium from diet plus supplementation.
  • If you are taking a calcium supplement, you should check that it also provides a significant amount of magnesium. If not, change supplements or make sure that you get the DV for magnesium elsewhere.
  • I am suggesting that you shoot for the DV (400 mg) of magnesium rather than reading every label and calculating the calcium to magnesium ratio. The “ideal” ratio of 2.3 to 1 is hypothetical at this point. A supplement providing the DV of both calcium and magnesium would have a calcium to magnesium ratio of 2.5, and I would not fault any manufacturer for providing you with the DV of both nutrients.
  • If you are taking high amounts of calcium, I would recommend a supplement that has a calcium to magnesium ratio of 2.5 or less.
  • If you are considering a magnesium supplement to optimize your magnesium status, you should be aware that magnesium can cause gas, bloating, and diarrhea. I would recommend a sustained release magnesium supplement.
  • Finally, whole grains and legumes are among your best dietary sources of magnesium. Forget those diets that tell you to eliminate whole food groups. They are likely to leave you magnesium-deficient.

Even if the conclusions of this study are not confirmed by subsequent studies, we need to remember that magnesium is an essential nutrient with many health benefits and that most Americans do not get enough magnesium in their diet. The recommendations I have made for optimizing magnesium status are common-sense recommendations that apply to all of us.

 

The Case For Holistic Supplementation

 

magnesium optimize vitamin d case for holistic supplementationThis study is one of many examples showing that a holistic approach to supplementation is superior to a “magic bullet” approach where you take individual nutrients to solve individual problems. For example, in the case of magnesium and vitamin D:

  • If you asked most nutrition experts and supplement manufacturers whether it is important to provide magnesium along with vitamin D, their answer would likely be “No”. Even if they are focused on bone health, they would be more likely to recommend calcium along with vitamin D than magnesium along with vitamin D.
  • If your doctor has tested your 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and recommended a vitamin D supplement, chances are they didn’t also recommend that you optimize your magnesium status.
  • Clinical studies investigating the benefits of vitamin D supplementation never ask whether magnesium intake is optimal.

That’s because most doctors and nutrition experts still think of nutrients as “magic bullets.” I cover holistic supplementation in detail in my book “Slaying The Supplement Myths.”  Other examples that make a case for holistic supplementation that I cover in my book include:

  • A study showing that omega-3 fatty acids and B vitamins may work together to prevent cognitive decline. Unfortunately, most studies looking at the effect of B vitamins on cognitive decline have not considered omega-3 status and vice versa. No wonder those studies have produced inconsistent results.
  • Studies looking at the effect of calcium supplementation on loss of bone density in the elderly have often failed to include vitamin D, magnesium, and other nutrients that are needed for building healthy bone. They have also failed to include exercise, which is essential for building healthy bone. No wonder some of those studies have failed to find an effect of calcium supplementation on bone density.
  • A study reported that selenium and vitamin E by themselves might increase prostate cancer risk. Those were the headlines you might have seen. The same study showed Vitamin E and selenium together did not increase prostate cancer risk. Somehow that part of the study was never mentioned.
  • A study reported that high levels of individual B vitamins increased mortality slightly. Those were the headlines you might have seen. The same study showed that when the same B vitamins were combined in a B complex supplement, mortality decreased. Somehow that observation never made the headlines.
  • A 20-year study reported that a holistic approach to supplementation produced significantly better health outcomes.

In summary, vitamins and minerals interact with each other to produce health benefits in our bodies. Some of those interactions we know about. Others we are still learning about. When we take high doses of individual vitamins and minerals, we create potential problems.

  • We may not get the full benefit of the vitamin or mineral we are taking because some other important nutrient(s) may be missing from our diet.
  • Even worse, high doses of one vitamin or mineral may interfere with the absorption or enhance the excretion of another vitamin or mineral. That can create deficiencies.

The same principles apply to our diet. I mentioned earlier that whole grains and legumes are among the best dietary sources of magnesium. Eliminating those two foods from the diet increases our risk of becoming magnesium deficient. And, that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Any time you eliminate foods or food groups from the diet, you run the risk of creating deficiencies of nutrients, phytonutrients, specific types of fiber, and the healthy gut bacteria that use that fiber as their preferred food source.

The Bottom Line

 

A recent study suggests that optimal magnesium status may be important for optimizing 25-hydroxyvitamin D status. This is one of many examples showing that a holistic approach to supplementation is superior to a “magic bullet” approach where you take individual nutrients to solve individual problems. For example, in the case of magnesium and vitamin D:

  • If you asked most nutrition experts and supplement manufacturers whether it is important to provide magnesium along with vitamin D, their answer would likely be “No.”  Even if they are focused on bone health, they would be more likely to recommend calcium along with vitamin D than magnesium along with vitamin D.
  • If your doctor has tested your 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and recommended a vitamin D supplement, chances are he or she did not also recommend that you optimize your magnesium status.
  • Clinical studies investigating the benefits of vitamin D supplementation never ask whether magnesium intake is optimal. That may be why so many of those studies have failed to find any benefit of vitamin D supplementation.

I cover holistic supplementation in detail in my book “Slaying The Supplement Myths” and provide several other examples where a holistic approach to supplementation is superior to taking individual supplements.

In summary, vitamins and minerals interact with each other to produce health benefits in our bodies. Some of those interactions we know about. Others we are still learning about. Whenever we take high doses of individual vitamins and minerals, we create potential problems.

  • We may not get the full benefit of the vitamin or mineral we are taking because some other important nutrient(s) may be missing from our diet.
  • Even worse, high doses of one vitamin or mineral may interfere with the absorption or enhance the excretion of another vitamin or mineral. That can create deficiencies.

The same principles apply to what we eat. For example, whole grains and legumes are among the best dietary sources of magnesium. Eliminating those two foods from the diet increases our risk of becoming magnesium deficient. And, that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Any time you eliminate foods or food groups from the diet, you run the risk of creating deficiencies.

For more details about the current study and what it means to you read the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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