Skin Damage From Sun

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Health Current Events, Skin Damage From Sun, Vitamin D

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

skin damage from sunSkin damage from sun is a real danger.  The dog days of summer are here. For some of us that means staying inside as much as possible. Others want to enjoy the fleeting days of summer as much as possible before summer turns to fall, and fall turns to winter. That means lots of outdoor activities in the sun – such as outdoor sports, working in the yard, and vacations in fun locations with lots of sun. So it’s time to ask the perennial question “How much sun exposure should I be getting?”

Some people like to aim for as much sun exposure as possible. When I was a teenager everybody was searching for “the perfect tan”. Back then it was popular to slather your skin with tanning oils that allowed you to just baste yourself in the sun without your skin drying up. (Did I just date myself again?)

Other people like to follow their dermatologist’s advice and use SPF maximum (the sun shall never touch my skin) sunscreens. And, just to be on the safe side they also follow their dermatologist’s advice to limit sun exposure between 10 AM and 4 PM and wear a hat, sunglasses, and protective clothing whenever possible. I can see the hat and sunglasses, but the protective clothing isn’t particularly compatible with the summer heat in my native North Carolina. Believe me, you want to wear as little as possible here in the summer.

Skin Damage From Sun

sun exposureNow that we’ve explored the extremes, let’s return to the central theme of this health tip which is “How much sun exposure should I really be getting?” Let’s start by focusing on the vanity factor – skin aging. Let’s face it. Excessive sun exposure increases the risk of skin cancer. However, skin aging is the consequence most people really care about. This is the concern that has most people reaching for the sunscreen before they head out the door.

A recent clinical study clearly showed that sunscreen usage helps prevent skin aging (Hughes et al, Annals of Internal Medicine, 158: 781-790, 2013). Now you might be saying to yourself “This is nothing new. I’ve heard that for years.” Yes, that advice has been around for a long time. But the problem is that the old advice was never based on actual clinical studies, only studies done on hairless mice. So first, let me analyze this clinical study for you and then put the findings into perspective.

The good news is that this was a very well done clinical study. The authors enrolled 903 adults under the age of 55 from sunny Australia into the study for a 4.5-year period from 1992 to 1996. The study was restricted to adults younger than 55 years because, in that age range, skin aging is primarily caused by sun exposure rather than the normal aging process. The study also excluded people who were already using sunscreen on a daily basis. Variables such as skin color, skin reaction to sun exposure, amount of time spent outdoors, sunburn history, and smoking status were determined at baseline and used to normalize the results.

Half of the participants were given a sunscreen with an SPF 15 factor and were instructed to use this sunscreen on a daily basis. The other half were given nothing and were just instructed to keep doing what they had been doing (It was deemed unethical to give them a placebo sunscreen as it could cause skin damage from sun). Compliance was assessed by measuring the weight of the returned sunscreen bottles every three months and by using a biennial application frequency questionnaire. Compliance wasn’t perfect, but of those enrolled in the sunscreen portion of the study 77% used sunscreen 3 to 4 times per week, compared to 33% of the control group.

Skin damage from sun was assessed by taking an impression of the back of the left-hand and analyzing it for the number and depth of lines and the flattening of the skin. And the results were fairly clear-cut. Those study participants who used sunscreen on a daily basis had 24% less sun damage over the 4.5-year period than the control group. I am not an expert, but dermatologists who have evaluated this study say that a 24% decrease in sun damage is visibly significant.

What Does This Study Mean For You?

It turns out that the old advice that too much sun exposure can cause significant skin damage as we get older is actually true. Who would have guessed? If the threat of skin cancer isn’t enough to dissuade you from pursuing the perfect tan, perhaps the thought of ugly, wrinkled skin as you get older will do it.

On the flip side, however, we need to remember that sun exposure is also required for vitamin D formation. And recent studies show that up to 80% of Americans have low levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D, the biologically relevant form of vitamin D, in their blood – perhaps because many of us actually follow our dermatologist’s advice and never go out of the house without sunscreen, sunglasses, hat, and protective clothing to help prevent skin damage from sun.

Recent clinical studies have linked low levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D with a number of health concerns. That has led one prominent dermatologist who studies vitamin D, Dr. Michael Holick, to recommend that we should be getting 10 to 15 minutes of unprotected sun exposure during midday – a recommendation that many of his colleagues consider to be heretical.

How Can You Have Your Cake And Eat It Too?

vitamin DSo what is a person to do? How can we reconcile the need to improve our vitamin D status with our desire to have a healthy, good looking skin well into our golden years? The simple answer is to make sure that we are getting plenty of vitamin D in our diet. The most recent RDAs are 600 IU per day of vitamin D in children and adults up to the age of 70 and 800 IU per day for adults over 70.

Many experts are even recommending that we get 1000 to 2000 IU of vitamin D per day. The Institute of Medicine (the group that actually sets the RDAs) considers that to be in the safe range for vitamin D intake. If you are thinking of exceeding that dosage, my advice would be to first get your 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels determined (20-50 ng/ml or 50-125 nmol/L is considered optimal) and then consult with your doctor as to what the best dosage of vitamin D is for you.

And, if you are relying on supplements for your vitamin D intake, you should be sure to choose a company that manufactures their supplements according to pharmaceutical standards. A recent study(E. S. LeBlanc et al, JAMA Internal Medicine, 173:585-586, 2013)  analyzed commercially available vitamin D supplements and found some brands in which the potency from bottle to bottle ranged from 9% to 140% of what was on the label. That is unacceptable.

 

The Bottom Line

  • A recent study has confirmed what we have been told for years, namely that regular use of an SPF 15 sunscreen reduces skin aging. Specifically, the study showed that regular sunscreen use reduced skin aging by 24% over a 4.5-year period in people 55 years old or younger.
  • On the other hand, sun exposure is required for our bodies to synthesize the active form of vitamin D. Vitamin D experts like Dr. Michael Holick recommend that we get at least 10-15 minutes of unprotected sun exposure a day during the summer months to assure that our bodies make the vitamin D we need for optimal health.
  • If you want both young looking skin and optimal vitamin D status, you will probably want to consider a vitamin D supplement. Recommendations for how much and what kind of vitamin D supplement are found in the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Latest Article

Relieve Hip Pain After Sitting or Driving

Posted June 20, 2017 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Relief is Just a Few Movements Away!

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT – The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

relieve hip pain after sittingI’m on a long business trip, speaking and teaching in Tennessee and New York, and the drive from Sarasota, FL meant many hours of driving over several days.  One of my stops was to visit with Suzanne and Dr. Steve Chaney at their home in North Carolina.  It was that long drive that became the inspiration for this blog.

After all those hours of driving, my hip was really sore. It was painful to stand up. While talking to Suzanne and Dr. Chaney I was using my elbow to work on the sore area, and when we were discussing the blog for this month it only made sense to share this technique with you.  So, Dr. Chaney took pictures and I sat at his computer to write.  I thought others may want to how to relieve hip pain after sitting or driving for long periods.

What Causes Anterior Hip Pain?

As I’ve mentioned in posts in the past, sitting is the #1 cause of low back pain, and it also causes anterior hip pain (pain localized towards the front of the hip) because the muscles (psoas and iliacus) pass through the hip and insert into the tendons that then insert into the top of the thigh bone.  When hip pain reliefyou try to stand up, the tight muscle tendons will pull on your thigh bone.  The other thing that happens is the point where the muscle merges into the tendon will be very tight and tender to touch. You aren’t having pain at your hip or thigh bone, but at the muscular point where the muscle and tendon merge.

It’s a bit confusing to describe, but you’ll find it if you sit down and put your fingers onto the tip of your pelvis, then just slide your fingers down toward your thigh and out about 2”. The point is right along the crease where your leg meets your trunk.

The muscle you are treating is the Rectus Femoris, where it merges from the tendon into the muscle fibers.  Follow this link, thigh muscle, to see the muscle and it will be a bit easier to visualize.

You need to be pressing deeply into the muscle, like you’re trying to press the bone and the muscle just happens to be in the way.  Move your fingers around a bit and you’ll find it.

Easy Treatment for Anterior Hip Pain After Sitting

relieve hip painHere is an easy treatment for hip pain after sitting you can administer yourself.  First, sit as I am, with your leg out and slightly turned.

Find the tender point with your fingers and then put your elbow into it as shown.

It’s important to have your arm opened so the point of your elbow is on top of the spasm.  It’s a bit tricky, but if you move about a bit you’ll come on to it, and it will hurt.  Keep the pressure so it’s tolerable, not excruciating.

After you have worked on this point for a few minutes you can move to the second part of the treatment.

hip pain treatmentPut the heel of your “same-side” hand onto your thigh as close to the spasm as you can get.  Lift up your fingers so the pressure is only on the heel of your hand.  You can use your opposite hand to help give more pressure.

Press down hard and deeply slide down the muscle, going toward your knee.  You can also kneed it like you would kneed bread dough, really forcing the muscle fibers to relax.

I’m putting in a picture from a previous blog to explain how you can also treat this point of your rectus femoris by using a ball on the floor.

As shown in this picture, lie on the floor with the ball on your hip muscle, and then slightly turn your body toward the floor so the ball rolls toward the front of your body. You may need to move the ball down an inch or so to get to your Rectus Femoris.

When you feel the pain, you’re on the muscle.  Just stay there for a minute or so, and if you want you can move so the ball goes along the muscle fibers all the way to your knee.

pain free living book coverIt may be a challenge to find this point, but it’s well-worth the effort!

In my book, Treat Yourself to Pain Free Living, I teach how to treat all the muscles that cause pain from your head to your feet.

Wishing you well,

Julie Donnelly

julie donnelly

About The Author

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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