Posts Tagged ‘diet’

Are Diet Pills Safe?

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Drugs and Health, Issues, Obesity

Another Diet Pill Bites the Dust

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

New Year DietThe New Year is upon us, and everyone is looking for an easy way to lose weight.

Let’s face it. Losing weight is difficult. You have to give up your favorite foods. You’re often hungry and cranky. You have to change your lifestyle. And did I mention that you might need to put on your running shoes and go for a run or, heaven forbid, actually go to the gym.

It’s so much easier to take one of those diet pills. You know the ones I’m talking about. They promise to give you energyburn the fatsuppress your appetite. All you need to do is take one of those little pills every day and, voila, you’re ready to try on that bikini.

It all sounds great. But are those diet pills really safe? A few weeks ago I shared with you that the experts have warned against the use of fat burning sports supplements. They consider them unsafe. Now it’s time to turn our attention to the fat burning diet pills.

Are Diet Pills Safe?

Lots of diet pills have come and gone over the years. Some have just faded away because they didn’t work. They didn’t live up to their claims. Others have been withdrawn from the market by regulatory agencies because they were dangerous or actually killed people- Ma huang and Fen-Phen come to mind, but there have been many others.

And now it looks like yet another diet pill, one called Dexaprine, may have the same fate.

The ads make it sound like a wonder pill.

  • “With one little change…you could feel energy all day long”
  • “With one little change…you can suppress your insatiable appetite”
  • “You can try another unsuccessful diet without it, but when you’re ready…the ultimate fat burner will be waiting for you with open arms.”

The Dark Side

And yet, like most diet pills, it also has a dark side. Side effects include insomnia, sweating, heart palpitations and high blood pressure. As if that weren’t bad enough, the supplement manufacturer that makes Dexaprine conducts no clinical studies on their products, so they have no idea whether their product is safe or not.

And, it appears that it may not be safe. Dutch authorities banned Dexaprine in August after reports of 11 adverse reactions associated with Dexaprine use in Holland since March of this year, including hospitalizations and severe heart problems. British authorizes followed suit the next day and issued a warning against use of “fat burner” supplements in general. It’s probably just a matter of time before other governments step in and ban Dexaprine as well.

And, it’s not just Dexaprine. New diet pills hit the market almost every day. And, they all have those same “magical” claims.

The Only Safe Drug Is A New Drug

It reminds me of the wise advice that a physician colleague of mine gave to the medical students near the start of their first year. He told them “The only safe drug is a new drug”. He went on to say that he didn’t mean that new drugs were safer than the older drugs. It’s just that we don’t know all of their bad side effects until they’ve been on the market for a few years.

Diets pills are no different. They burst on the market full of promise. But, once they’ve been on the market for a year or two, reports of their bad side effects start to appear. We start to learn just how dangerous they are. And, one by one, they all bite the dust.

The Bottom Line

1)     There is no “Tooth Fairy”. There is no “Easter Bunny”. And, there is no magical pill that will SAFELY melt the pounds away. You simply don’t want to risk the diet pill solution – no matter how easy it sounds. No magical, “quick fix” diet solution is worth risking permanent heart damage – or worse.

2)     If you are fortunate to lose weight safely using one of those diet pills, you won’t have learned anything. You won’t have changed anything. The weight will come right back on.

3)     Permanent weight loss requires a permanent change to your lifestyle. Some of those changes will be difficult at first, but once those lifestyle changes become habits – once they become part of who you are, they will become easy.

You can achieve both the weight and the health you want!

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

The Two Biggest Misconceptions About Supplementation

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Issues, Supplements and Health

Secrets You Need To Know

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

Nutrition MythsIn last week’s “Health Tips From The Professor” I told you the truth behind the headlines that vitamins are a waste of money. This week I’m going to be talking about the two biggest misconceptions that people have about supplementation. These are two secrets you need to know.

The Two Biggest Misconceptions About Supplementation

I won’t keep you in suspense. The answer is pretty simple. The two biggest misconceptions about supplementation that I hear over and over are:

1)     Supplementation can cure disease

2)     It doesn’t matter what you eat (or what supplements you take)

Of course, those statements don’t tell you much by themselves, so let’s delve into the subject more deeply.

Misconception #1: Supplementation can cure disease.

I don’t know how many times I’ve been asked “I have “disease X”. What supplements should I take? – as if supplements were drugs that can be taken to cure a disease.

We shouldn’t think of supplements as drugs that cure diseases. We should think of them as providing the nutrients that are the building blocks of health – or perhaps the ammunition that the body uses to fight diseases. Diseases, after all, are an abnormal state of being, and our bodies have an amazing capacity to fight those diseases.

When we have infections or cancer our body activates its immune system to fight it. When we have inflammation our body tries to put out the fire. When we have damage to our DNA – our genetic information – our body tries to repair it. The list is almost endless. Our bodies are wondrously designed!

Our immune systems require nutrients like protein, B vitamins, antioxidants, zinc and iron. The omega-3 fatty acids, anti-oxidants and polyphenols like resveratrol are anti-inflammatory. Nutrients like antioxidants and polyphenols support DNA repair.

So proper diet and supplementation are not “magic bullets” that cure diseases. They are simply the building blocks that allow the body to do what it does best.

And because no two of us are alike the nutrients that we need the most to allow our bodies to do their job efficiently may be different for each one of us.

So while there is no magic food or supplement that will cure a specific disease, a healthy diet and a holistic approach to supplementation can often work wonders.

Misconception #2: It doesn’t matter what you eat.

This is the flip side of the coin. I often come across people who have been told by the “experts” that the cause of their disease was not related to diet so they shouldn’t worry about what they eat. They are also usually told that supplementation will not do any good.

Let’s take the most extreme example – genetically caused diseases or serious degenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s for which the causes are still not fully understood.

It is generally true that these diseases were not caused by poor diet (MS may be the exception because there is some evidence that it can be caused by inadequate vitamin D during childhood). And I know many people who take the “expert’s” advice to heart and eat whatever they like and consider supplementation a waste of money.

Is that a sound approach? Let’s consider.

Any nutritionist will tell you that an inadequate diet can lead to malaise, low energy, inflammation, weakened immune system and impaired wound healing – just to name a few maladies. Even if you don’t end up with the symptoms of a nutritional deficiency, a poor diet can rob you of energy and vitality.

If you layer the consequences of a poor diet on top of the underlying disease, your chances of being able to cope with the disease and function optimally are greatly diminished.

I have come across many people with very serious diseases who are able to function at a very high level through proper diet and a holistic approach to supplementation.

Diet and supplementation did not cure their disease as they quickly discover if they stop supplementing and go back to the way they used to eat, but in many cases you would consider them to be perfectly healthy as long as they keep doing what they have been doing.

The Bottom Line

1) There is no perfect food or supplement that is capable of curing disease, but if you give your body the nutrients that it needs it often has the ability to heal itself.

2) Proper diet and supplementation can make a difference even if the disease was not caused by poor nutrition.

3) Each of us have unique nutritional needs so a holistic approach to diet and supplementation is best.

I didn’t specifically talk about weight control and exercise, but you should know from my previous “Health Tips From The Professor” that I consider them to be an essential part of any holistic health program.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Latest Article

How Long Do the Benefits of Supplements Last?

Posted October 23, 2018 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Can Supplements Set You On A Path Towards A Healthier Life?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

benefits of supplements heartA recent study (U Alehagen et al, PLOS One, April 11, 2018, 1-15 ) reported that the heart benefits of supplementation with coenzyme Q10 and selenium persisted for 12 years after supplementation ended. You would have thought a story like that would have made the headlines. Nope. Hardly a mention. Perhaps it did not match the narrative of the media and health professionals that supplements are worthless.

This study broke new ground. Most studies last a year or two and report whether there were any benefits of supplementation. A few studies have been extended a few years beyond the original supplementation period and have reported continued benefits of supplementation. However, in those studies the intervention group was still taking supplements. The intervention period was simply extended.

However, this study was unique in that supplementation was discontinued after 4 years. However, the positive effects of supplementation during that four-year period persisted for another 12 years without additional supplementation.

 

How Was The Study Done?

benefits of supplements monitoring heartIn this study 443 elderly individuals (average age =78) were recruited from a rural village in Sweden. They were given either supplements providing 200 mg/day of coenzyme Q10 and 200 mcg/day of selenium yeast or placebo pills. They were followed for four years. At this point the intervention phase of the trial ended, and the participants were followed for another 12 years without supplementation.

Cardiovascular deaths and all-cause mortality were recorded at 4 years (the end of the original intervention period), 10 years, and 12 years. The Swedish health care system is incredibly efficient. None of the participants were lost to follow-up.

Note on study design: Both coenzyme Q10 and selenium have heart health benefits and they compliment each other. Coenzyme Q10 was included in this study because our bodies lose the ability to make coenzyme Q10 as we age. By the time we reach age 80, we only make around half the coenzyme Q10 we made when we were younger. Selenium was included in the study because most Swedes are selenium deficient.

This study measured selenium levels and confirmed that all participants were selenium deficient at the beginning of the study. Selenium levels increased to near optimal in the supplemented group during the 4-year intervention period. In contrast, the placebo group remained selenium deficient.

 

How Long Do the Benefits of Supplements Last?

benefits of supplementationThe results of the study were truly amazing.

When you compared the group that had received coenzyme Q10 and selenium during the first 4 years of the study with the placebo group:

  • Cardiovascular mortality was 38% less and all-cause mortality was 24% less 12 years later in the supplement group.
  • The decrease in cardiovascular mortality lessened slightly with time (53% lower at 4 years, 46% lower at 10 years, and 38% lower at 12 years.
  • In contrast, the decrease in all-cause mortality remained relatively constant.
  • The effect was greater for women (who have lower coenzyme Q10 levels than men) than it was for men.
  • The decrease in cardiovascular mortality was 57% for women and 22% for men.
  • Cardiovascular mortality was decreased by 40-50% for people at high risk of cardiovascular death because of atherosclerosis, diabetes, high blood pressure, or impaired heart function.

Putting This Study Into Perspective

benefits of supplements wellnessI don’t want to read too much into this study. It has multiple limitations:

  • It is a very small study.
  • It is the first study I am aware of that has followed study participants years after supplementation has ended. More studies like this are clearly needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.
  • It may be unique to Sweden where selenium deficiency is widespread. Selenium deficiency is much less prevalent in some other countries such as the United States.
  • It is possible that once the study population heard about the results of the initial 4-year study they started self-supplementing with coenzyme Q10 and selenium. However, since the participants did not know whether they were in the supplement or placebo group, that would likely affect both groups equally.

However, it is the implications of the study that fascinate me.

  • The authors of the study speculated that the improvement in endothelial cell function (Endothelial cells line the arteries and play an important role in arterial health) and/or decreased inflammation may have persisted long after supplementation stopped.
  • A more interesting idea is that supplementation (or the effects of supplementation) caused modifications to the DNA that were persistent (something we refer to as epigenetics). Moreover, those DNA modifications may have altered gene expression in a manner that reduced heart disease risk.

Much more work needs to be done before we know whether epigenetic modifications were responsible for the persistent benefit of supplementation in this, or any other, study. However, the ramifications of this idea are substantial. We think of supplementation as something that provides benefit only while we are taking the supplement. What if, under the right conditions, supplementation could send us down an entirely different path to better health? That would be worth major headlines.

 

The Bottom Line

 

A recent study in Sweden looked at the effects of supplementation with coenzyme Q10 and selenium on heart health 12 years after supplementation had ended.

  • The study reported that cardiovascular mortality was 38% less and all-cause mortality was 24% less 12 years later in the group that supplemented during the first 4 years.

The study has multiple limitations and needs to be repeated before drawing any definite conclusions. However, if true, it has interesting implications. What if the benefits of supplementation didn’t stop when you stopped supplementing? What if supplementation sent you down an entirely different path, a path towards better health?

For more details, read the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

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