Vitamin D and Multiple Sclerosis | Preventive Care?

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in current health articles, Vitamins and Health

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

vitamin d and multiple sclerosisA new study (Mokry et al, PLOS Medicine, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001866, August 25, 2015) suggests that people who are genetically prone to low vitamin D levels are at increased risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). To understand the importance of this study and what it means for us, we need to first review what is already known about vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.

  • MS is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the myelin sheath that coats our nerves. Conceptually, that’s the equivalent of a fraying cord on a lamp. Eventually, the cord is going to start shorting out and the lamp won’t work very well. On a very basic level MS is similar. As our myelin sheath is damaged over time, our nervous system starts working less well.
  • The earliest evidence that vitamin D status might be associated with MS was the observation that the prevalence of MS was highest for people who lived in northern regions with little exposure to sunlight.
  • Numerous studies since then have shown that MS patients generally have lower 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in their blood.

These studies clearly show an association between low vitamin D status and MS, but association does not prove causation. There are two limitations of association studies that significantly reduce their predictive value – reverse causation and confounding factors.Those are both somewhat highfalutin scientific terms, so let me put them in plain English – and in terms that are relevant to our discussion of vitamin D status and MS.

Reverse causation simple means that the MS might have caused low vitamin D status. For example, individuals with MS might spend less time outdoors because of their physical limitations. That would result in less sun exposure, which would decrease their blood levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D.

A confounding factor would be something else that increased the risk for MS and happened to be associated with low vitamin D status. Suppose, for example, that exercise decreased the risk of MS. People who spend most of their time inside in front of a TV or computer screen would have low levels of exercise and low sun exposure. If it was the lack of exercise rather than the low vitamin D status that actually predisposed to MS, lack of exercise would be a confounding factor for any clinical study comparing vitamin D status with risk of developing MS.

 

What Can Genetics Tell Us About The Relationship Between Vitamin D and Multiple Sclerosis?

does-vitamin-d-prevent-msThe authors of this study had previously identified mutations in 4 genes that decrease blood levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (the most commonly used measure of vitamin D status). In this study(Mokry et al, PLOS Medicine, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001866, August 25, 2015)they analyzed the frequency of those genetic mutations in 14,498 MS cases compared with 24,091 healthy controls. Their study showed:

  • Genetic mutations that decrease 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels are associated with a significant increase in the risk of developing MS.
  • Based on the relationship of those mutations with 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels, they calculated that every 50% increase in 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels was associated with a 50% decreased risk of developing MS.

This was a very large, well designed study. It has some limitations of its own, but because it used a genetic approach it largely avoids the concern about reverse causation and confounding factors. In short, this study strongly supports the conclusion from previous studies that low vitamin D status significantly increases the risk of developing MS.

The authors concluded “The identification of vitamin D as a causal susceptibility factor for MS may have important public health implications, since vitamin D insufficiency is common, and vitamin D supplementation is both relatively safe and cost effective.”

 

Is Vitamin D Supplementation Effective In Preventing And Treating MS?

Vitamin DThe authors of the study also concluded “These findings provide the rationale for further investigating the therapeutic benefits of vitamin D supplementation in preventing the onset and progression of MS.”

While more studies are still needed, the Nurses’ Health Study (Munger et al, Neurology, 62: 60-65, 2004) provides pretty convincing evidence that vitamin D supplementation can prevent the onset of MS. That study followed 187,563 nurses for at least 4 years, during which time 173 of them developed MS. The study showed that supplementation with 400 IU/day of vitamin D reduced the risk of developing MS by 40%.

The efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in preventing the progression of MS is much less well established. Several studies have shown that low vitamin D status is associated with higher levels MS relapse and more rapid progression of MS symptoms.However, studies of vitamin D supplementation conducted to date have been too small and too short in duration to be definitive.

What Is The Significance Of This Study?

On one hand MS is a very rare disease, affecting around 0.1% of the adult population. On the other hand, it is a debilitating disease. If something as simple as assuring adequate vitamin D status can reduce the risk of developing MS by 40-50%, it is an important public health measure, especially since 40% of the US population has insufficient blood levels of vitamin D (Looker et al, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 88: 1519-1527, 2008).

What Does This Study Mean For You?

SunWhat does this study mean for you and me? We already know that adequate vitamin D status is essential for building strong bones, and there is pretty good evidence that adequate vitamin D status is important for a strong immune system. Now we can add autoimmune diseases to the list. It is pretty clear that adequate vitamin D status is important for preventing MS. It may help prevent other autoimmune diseases as well.

One interesting wrinkle for MS is that it may be vitally important to assure adequate vitamin D in our younger years. Studies looking at people who grow up in northern latitudes and then move south and vice versa suggest that the risk of developing MS is much more strongly associated with sun exposure during the first 10-15 years of life than with sun exposure later in life.

It is, therefore, not just important that we assure adequate vitamin D status for ourselves. It may be even more important that we assure that our kids and grandkids have adequate vitamin D status.

The problem is that in today’s world we are told to slather industrial strength sunscreen on ourselves from head to foot before we leave the house and very few foods in nature provide significant amounts of vitamin D, so most of us rely primarily on vitamin D fortified dairy products and supplements to assure adequate intake of vitamin D. Click here for the latest RDA recommendations for vitamin D intake.

Some people do appear to need greater than RDA levels of vitamin D because they don’t metabolize vitamin D efficiently. They can have adequate intake of vitamin D, but their blood levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D are low. I recommend that you ask your doctor to check your 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels at your next physical. If they are low, work out a vitamin D supplementation regimen with your doctor to bring your 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels into the optimal range.

 

The Bottom Line

  • A recent study showed that genetic mutations which decrease 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels are associated with a significantly increased risk of developing MS. Based on the relationship of those mutations with 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels, the investigators calculated that every 50% increase in 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels was associated with a 50% decreased risk of developing MS. This study strongly supports the conclusion from previous studies that low vitamin D status significantly increases the risk of developing MS.
  • An earlier Nurses’ Health Study has shown that supplementation with 400 IU/day of vitamin D decreases the risk of developing MS by 40%.
  • The authors of the most recent study concluded “The identification of vitamin D as a causal susceptibility factor for MS may have important public health implications, since vitamin D insufficiency is common, and vitamin D supplementation is both relatively safe and cost effective.” I agree.
  • While MS is a very rare disease, it can be devastating. This alone, is a good enough reason to be sure that you maintain adequate vitamin D status.
  • There is evidence that vitamin D status in our childhood years may be more important than our vitamin D status in later years for determining our risk of developing MS. It is, therefore, not just important that we assure adequate vitamin D status for ourselves. It may be even more important that we assure that our kids and grandkids have adequate vitamin D status.
  • While these and other studies demonstrate the health benefits of maintaining adequate vitamin D status, many Americans don’t do a good job of it. Government surveys show that 40% of Americans are deficient in vitamin D. That’s because we are continually being advised to slather on industrial strength sunscreen before we leave the house, and most naturally occurring foods are relatively poor sources of vitamin D.
  • While the evidence that vitamin D supplementation is effective for preventing MS is strong, evidence that vitamin D supplementation can slow the progression of MS is inconclusive at present. More and better studies are needed before we will have a definitive answer to this question.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Shermer’s Neck Pain Relief

Posted January 16, 2018 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Shermer’s Neck Is An Ultra-Cyclist’s Nightmare

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT – The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

shermer's neck pain ultracyclistShermer’s Neck is a condition where the muscles of the back of your neck become so tight that they lose the ability to hold your head up. It is a condition most frequently associated with ultracycling.

Do you love to cycle?  Perhaps you’re an ultracyclist and ride for many hours every week.  If you are, you may already know about Shermer’s Neck.

As you are well-aware, an ultracyclist leans forwardThis is called the “aerodynamic position.” When you do that, you are slicing through the wind, and you aren’t losing speed when the wind hits your chest. However, you need to hold your head up to see where you are going and maintain that position for several hours. That is what causes Shermer’s Neck.

Shermer’s Neck And The Non-Athlete

shermer's neck pain painterYou don’t have to be an ultracyclist to suffer from Shermer’s Neck. Do you do anything that has you look up for hours, such as being a house painter? Even something as simple as having your computer screen too high can force you to have your head tilted up for long periods of time while working.

If so, Shermer’s Neck can still affect you, and seriously impact your life. Fortunately, non-athletes don’t usually have as severe a problem as the ultracyclists.

Why Does Looking Up Cause Shermer’s Neck?

shermer's neck painYour posterior neck muscles primarily originate at the middle of your back, along your spine. They go up your back and neck, and insert into either your cervical spine, or the bottom of your skull. When these muscles contract, they pull your head back.  When the muscles of the posterior neck contract, if you are standing, you’ll be looking at the ceiling. If you’re a cyclist, your posterior neck muscles contract in order for you to look forward.

How To Treat The Muscles That Cause Shermer’s Neck

shermer's neck pain pinchThe primary muscles that cause Shermer’s Neck are:

To treat the muscles that cause a repetitive strain injury in your neck, tilt your head back and pinch the muscle that is right next to your spine.

shermer's neck pain reliefNext, press the three middle fingers of your opposite hand deeply into the muscle fibers, going from the base of your scalp to as far as you can reach down the center of your back, right alongside your spinal column.

While pressing deeply, slowly lower your chin toward your chest so you are stretching the muscle fibers.  Don’t let your hand slide on your neck or you will miss the stretch.

Do both self-treatments on both sides of your neck.

shermer's neck pain relief bookYou can find the full treatments for your entire neck and upper back by going to my book, Treat Yourself to Pain-Free Living . This book has treatments for your entire body, from your head to your feet.  YOU are your own Best Therapist!  Stop pain quickly and easily with self-treatments you can do anytime, anyplace.  Get relief from Shermer’s Neck pain by following the steps above.

Wishing you well,

Julie Donnelly

 

About The Author

julie donnellyJulie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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