Does Vitamin D Help Prevent Asthma Attacks?

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Prevent Asthma Attacks, Vitamin D, Vitamins and Health

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

breaking newsWhat do the experts say about vitamin D helping to prevent asthma attacks?  You’ve seen the headlines. Vitamin D is no longer just for healthy bones. It has become the latest “miracle” nutrient. If you believe everything you read, vitamin D can prevent or cure everything from multiple sclerosis to diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Unfortunately, the evidence for many of those claims is weak.

However, the effect of vitamin D on the severity of asthma symptoms appears to be an exception. That relationship appears to be on much more solid ground.

A review published last year(S.K. Bantz et al, Annals of Pediatrics and Child Health, 3: pii: 1032, 2015) concluded “We emphasize that all children, especially those who are asthmatic, should be assessed to ensure adequate intake or supplementation with at least the minimum recommended doses of vitamin D. The simple intervention of vitamin D supplementation may provide significant clinical improvement in atopic disease, especially asthma.” [Note: Atopic disease refers to diseases characterized by a hyperallergenic response, such as eczema, hay fever, and asthma.]

That was followed by the recent publication of a Cochrane Review  that concluded “Vitamin D is likely to offer protection against severe asthma attacks”. To understand the significance of that statement you need to understand that this is not just another clinical study or another review. Cochrane Reviews are conducted by an international group of experts and are considered the “Gold Standard” for evidence-based medicine.

You may remember that famous commercial: “When E.F. Hutton speaks, people listen.”  In this case: “When Cochrane Reviews speak, doctors listen.”

Let’s look briefly at how the review was conducted, and then examine exactly what the review said, and what it didn’t say.

Does Vitamin D Help Prevent Asthma Attacks?

certifiedOne of the characteristics of Cochrane Reviews that set them apart from many of the other reviews that you find in the literature is that they include only the highest quality clinical studies in their analysis. This is one of the things that gives them such credibility.

This particular Cochrane Review included seven trials involving a total of 435 children and two trials involving a total of 658 adults. Most trial participants had mild to moderate asthma. The duration of the trials ranged from four to 12 months.  All studies were placebo controlled and used close to RDA recommended doses of vitamin D.

The results were pretty clear cut:

  • Vitamin D supplementation reduced the average number of severe asthma attacks requiring treatment with oral steroids by 36%.  This conclusion was based on 3 high-quality studies involving 680 participants.  Here, these studies clearly show vitamin D does  help prevent asthma attacks.
  • Vitamin D supplementation reduced the number of acute asthma attacks requiring emergency room visits and/or hospitalizations by 50%. This conclusion was based on 7 high-quality studies with 963 participants.  These studies also show vitamin D helps prevent asthma attacks.
  • None of the studies reported any severe adverse effects from vitamin D supplementation. (Compare that with all warnings associated with those ads for asthma medications you see on TV.)

However, they did not see any effect of vitamin D supplementation on day-to-day asthma symptoms.

What Does This Study Mean For You?

prevent asthmaThis study strongly suggests that vitamin D supplementation in the RDA range (600 IU for ages 1-70 and 800 IU for adults over 70) significantly reduces the risk of severe asthma attacks requiring steroids or hospitalization. Thus, if you or your child have asthma, vitamin D supplementation in the RDA range just makes sense.

However, this study also suggest that vitamin D is not a panacea that will make all asthma symptoms disappear.

Also, even Cochrane Reviews have limitations.

  • None of the studies included in this review looked at vitamin D status prior to the study. We simply don’t know whether vitamin D supplementation might be effective at reducing day-to-day asthma symptoms in individuals who were vitamin D deficient.
  • The studies included in this review did not include asthma sufferers with severe symptoms. Again, we don’t know whether vitamin D supplementation might make day-to-day symptoms more tolerable and easily controlled for people with severe asthma symptoms

One final thought: Blood levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D are the best indicators of vitamin D status. For reasons that we don’t understand, not everyone consuming RDA levels of vitamin D ends up with optimal levels (50-75 nmoles/L).  For that reason, it is a good idea to get your blood levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D tested as part of your annual physical exam.

If you are already getting RDA levels of vitamin D and your 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels are not in the optimal range, you may want to supplement with extra vitamin D.  Just be sure to monitor your 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels on a regular basis to make sure they don’t exceed the optimal range.

So, according to the Cochrane Review, vitamin D does help prevent asthma attacks.

 

The Bottom Line

 

  • A recent Cochrane Review concluded that vitamin D supplementation in the RDA range (600 IU for ages 1-70 and 800 IU for adults over 70) significantly reduces the risk of severe asthma attacks requiring steroids or hospitalization in both children and adults. This is significant because Cochrane Reviews are considered the Gold Standard for evidence-based medicine.
  • Thus, if you or your child have asthma, vitamin D supplementation in the RDA range just makes sense.
  • However, blood levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D are the best measure of vitamin status, and not everyone consuming RDA levels of vitamin D ends up with optimal levels (50-75 nmoles/L). If you are already getting RDA levels of vitamin D in your diet and your 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels are not in the optimal range, you may want to supplement with extra vitamin D. Just be sure to monitor your 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels on a regular basis to make sure they don’t exceed the optimal range.
  • This Cochrane Review did not find any effect of vitamin D supplementation on day-to-day asthma symptoms.
  • However, even Cochrane Reviews have limitations.
  • None of the studies included in this review looked at vitamin D status prior to the study. We simply don’t know whether vitamin D supplementation might be effective at reducing day-to-day asthma symptoms in individuals who were vitamin D deficient.
  • The studies included in this review did not include asthma sufferers with severe symptoms. Again, we don’t know whether vitamin D supplementation might make day-to-day symptoms more tolerable and easily controlled for people with severe asthma symptoms

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Latest Article

Relieve Hip Pain After Sitting or Driving

Posted June 20, 2017 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Relief is Just a Few Movements Away!

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT – The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

relieve hip pain after sittingI’m on a long business trip, speaking and teaching in Tennessee and New York, and the drive from Sarasota, FL meant many hours of driving over several days.  One of my stops was to visit with Suzanne and Dr. Steve Chaney at their home in North Carolina.  It was that long drive that became the inspiration for this blog.

After all those hours of driving, my hip was really sore. It was painful to stand up. While talking to Suzanne and Dr. Chaney I was using my elbow to work on the sore area, and when we were discussing the blog for this month it only made sense to share this technique with you.  So, Dr. Chaney took pictures and I sat at his computer to write.  I thought others may want to how to relieve hip pain after sitting or driving for long periods.

What Causes Anterior Hip Pain?

As I’ve mentioned in posts in the past, sitting is the #1 cause of low back pain, and it also causes anterior hip pain (pain localized towards the front of the hip) because the muscles (psoas and iliacus) pass through the hip and insert into the tendons that then insert into the top of the thigh bone.  When hip pain reliefyou try to stand up, the tight muscle tendons will pull on your thigh bone.  The other thing that happens is the point where the muscle merges into the tendon will be very tight and tender to touch. You aren’t having pain at your hip or thigh bone, but at the muscular point where the muscle and tendon merge.

It’s a bit confusing to describe, but you’ll find it if you sit down and put your fingers onto the tip of your pelvis, then just slide your fingers down toward your thigh and out about 2”. The point is right along the crease where your leg meets your trunk.

The muscle you are treating is the Rectus Femoris, where it merges from the tendon into the muscle fibers.  Follow this link, thigh muscle, to see the muscle and it will be a bit easier to visualize.

You need to be pressing deeply into the muscle, like you’re trying to press the bone and the muscle just happens to be in the way.  Move your fingers around a bit and you’ll find it.

Easy Treatment for Anterior Hip Pain After Sitting

relieve hip painHere is an easy treatment for hip pain after sitting you can administer yourself.  First, sit as I am, with your leg out and slightly turned.

Find the tender point with your fingers and then put your elbow into it as shown.

It’s important to have your arm opened so the point of your elbow is on top of the spasm.  It’s a bit tricky, but if you move about a bit you’ll come on to it, and it will hurt.  Keep the pressure so it’s tolerable, not excruciating.

After you have worked on this point for a few minutes you can move to the second part of the treatment.

hip pain treatmentPut the heel of your “same-side” hand onto your thigh as close to the spasm as you can get.  Lift up your fingers so the pressure is only on the heel of your hand.  You can use your opposite hand to help give more pressure.

Press down hard and deeply slide down the muscle, going toward your knee.  You can also kneed it like you would kneed bread dough, really forcing the muscle fibers to relax.

I’m putting in a picture from a previous blog to explain how you can also treat this point of your rectus femoris by using a ball on the floor.

As shown in this picture, lie on the floor with the ball on your hip muscle, and then slightly turn your body toward the floor so the ball rolls toward the front of your body. You may need to move the ball down an inch or so to get to your Rectus Femoris.

When you feel the pain, you’re on the muscle.  Just stay there for a minute or so, and if you want you can move so the ball goes along the muscle fibers all the way to your knee.

pain free living book coverIt may be a challenge to find this point, but it’s well-worth the effort!

In my book, Treat Yourself to Pain Free Living, I teach how to treat all the muscles that cause pain from your head to your feet.

Wishing you well,

Julie Donnelly

julie donnelly

About The Author

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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