Warm Up Before Stretching

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Stretching

Avoid Muscle Pain Before It Starts

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT –The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

give thanksNovember is the month that reminds us to be grateful for all the blessings we enjoy because we are Americans.  Of course, we should be grateful every day for the freedoms we have in this beautiful country! Have you thought about the freedom you enjoy the most?  For me it’s the freedom to worship however I choose because we don’t have a particular religion forced on us. I also love the fact that I can own my business and move it anywhere I like in the entire country.

I hope you’ll give some thought to what you are grateful for as this happy holiday draws near.

 

Should we warm up before stretching?

 

Avoid Muscle Pain Before It Starts

 

Now that the weather has turned cooler in all parts of the USA, more people are exercising outdoors.  Are you?  Be sure to warm up your muscles before you go running or cycling.  One good way to gently and effectively warm up your joints is to bring them into their full range-of-motion. This is also a great morning routine when you first get up.

warm up before stretching ropeYou have been told to stretch before you exercise. However, stretching while a muscle is tied up with spasms that shorten its fibers may cause the muscle fibers to get micro-tears. You could be creating muscle pain rather than avoiding muscle pain.

As an analogy, think about what happens if you tie a rope in knots and then try to stretch it to its original length without first untying the knots.  That is exactly what happens when you try to stretch a muscle that is tight or has spasms.  Release the spasms by warming up first, and then stretch.  It works great and will assure that you don’t hurt worse after stretching than you did before you stretched.

 

Warm Up Before Stretching

warm up before stretching arms upThe key here is not attempting to stretch your muscles, but to just gently move your joints. Here is a whole-body warm-up procedure I recommend.

warm up before stretching arms outFirst, bring your arm all the way across the front of your body, then slowly help the movement by linking your opposite arm across your elbow and pull your arm toward your chest.  Repeat this with your opposite arm, loosening the back of your shoulders.  Only go to the point of “feels so good,” never to a point of pain.

Then bring both arms as far back as you can, releasing the front of your shoulders.  While you’re there, move your head and neck down toward your chest and around to the side, moving the top of your shoulders and neck.

warm up before stretching stretch backwarm up before stretching legs outNext, with your arms still out to the side, rotate your arms forward several times, and then backwards several times. Your intention is to move your shoulder joint in as many directions as possible, always doing the movement gently and slowly.

Warm up your waist and lower back by keeping your hips still and rotating your upper body as far to the left as you comfortably can, and then as far to the right.  The goal here is to gently move all the joints from your mid-back to your hips.

To loosen your hip joint, you’ll want to easily swing your leg back and forth. If you are standing with your foot on the floor, you’ll need to hold your foot up, so it clears the floor.

When possible, it’s good to be standing on a step or some books so the foot on your swinging leg will be relaxed. Below I am demonstrating by warm up before stretching legsstanding on two packs of copy paper.

warm up before stretching legs backStand with your right leg on a step, and then slowly and gently swing your left leg back and forth.  Let your leg drop, giving an easy stretch to your hip joint.  Then reverse so you can do the same to your right leg & hip.  Then hold on to something and swing your leg in front of you, going from side-to-side.

This entire program will take from 5-10 minutes of your time, and its goal is to just get your joints moving.  It should always feel good, like you are waking up your joints to prepare for the day. There are many good morning routines to loosen up joints that stiffen while sleeping.

After you have released the knots in your muscles, you can stretch safely.  Now you are ready to start your day!

 

How to Untie the Spasms that are Knotting Up Your Muscles

 

inner knee pain free livingIf your muscles have painful knots, this gentle warm-up procedure is not always enough. I also teach people how to untie the knots (spasms) that form in muscles. Those knots shorten the fibers and put a strain on the joints.  I always recommend that you apply direct pressure on the knots, holding the pressure for 30 seconds to press toxins out of the fibers and draw blood into the muscle.

warm up before stretching pain freeIf you have been to see me at my office, you know that I always teach how to do two or three of the Julstro Method self-treatments that will help you stop pain.  I’ve been doing this for years, and it works.

Back in 2001 I wrote my first self-treatment book titled The Pain-Free Triathlete. At the time most of my clients were either serious athletes or Ironman triathletes.  That ultimately expanded to become a book for the general public and in 2010 I wrote Treat Yourself to Pain-Free Living.  Thanks to print-on-demand that book was constantly updated and revised, with the latest version being done in 2018.  Then I wrote the updated book for athletes titled: The Pain-Free Athlete. 

yoga pain relief dvdI also have a DVD stretching program that combines all the self-treatments with a safe Yoga stretching routine.  That DVD program is titled Focused Flexibility Training, although it started out as Trigger Point Yoga (only the name was changed).

warm up before stretching bacl pain solutionThe 15 Minute Back Pain Solution was another book added to the collection. This book focuses on the muscles that specifically cause low back pain, and hip/groin/knee pain, as well as sciatica.  Originally it was only available as a Kindle book, but it is now being printed and will be ready soon.

It’s not difficult to release the tight muscle spasms that are causing you pain, it just takes a bit of direction to know how to find the point and how to treat it.  Each of these books and DVD programs show you how to do that quickly and easily.

You can look at each of these books and programs by going to www.JulstroMethod.com/shop

 

Wishing you well,

 

Julie Donnelly

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

About The Author

julie donnelly

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

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Latest Article

Best Diet For Heart Disease Prevention

Posted July 9, 2019 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Are The American Heart Association’s Recommendations Correct?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

What is the best diet for heart disease prevention? 

diet for heart disease preventionHeart disease is a killer. It continues to be the leading cause of death – both worldwide and in industrialized countries like the United States and the European Union. When we look at heart disease trends, it is a good news – bad news situation.

  • The good news is that heart disease deaths are continuing to decline in adults over 70.
  • The decline among senior citizens is attributed to improved treatment of heart disease and more seniors following heart-healthy diets.
  • The bad news is that heart disease deaths are starting to increase in younger adults, something I reported in an earlier issue, Heart Attacks Increasing in Young Women of “Health Tips From the Professor.”
  • The reason for the rise in heart disease deaths in young people is less clear. However, the obesity epidemic, junk and convenience foods, and the popularity of fad diets all likely play a role.

Everyone has a magic diet for reducing heart disease risk. The American Heart Association tells us to avoid fats, especially saturated fats. Vegans tell us to avoid animal protein. Paleo and keto enthusiasts tell us carbs are the problem. Who is correct?

Of course, we don’t eat fats, carbohydrates, or proteins. We eat foods. That is why a recent study (T Meier et al, European Journal of Epidemiology, 34: 37-45, 2019) is so important. It reported which foods increase and which decrease the risk of premature heart disease deaths.

How Was The Study Done?

diet for heart disease prevention studyThe authors of the current study analyzed data from the “Global Burden of Diseases (GBD) Study”, a major world-wide effort designed to estimate the portions of deaths caused by various risk factors.

The current study focused on the impact of 12 dietary risk factors on heart disease deaths between 1990 and 2016 for 51 countries in four regions (Western Europe, Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia).

The dietary risk factors were:

  • Diets low in fiber, fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds, polyunsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids, and whole grains.
  • Diets high in sodium, processed meats, sugar-sweetened beverages, and trans fatty acids.

Saturated fat and meat were not explicitly included in the GBS Study data. However, diets low in polyunsaturated fats and omega-3 fats are likely high in saturated fats. Similarly, diets low in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes are likely higher in meats. The study also did not include dairy, and some recent studies suggest that some dairy foods may decrease heart disease risk.

For simplicity I will only consider the findings from Western Europe because their diet and heart disease death trends are similar to those in the United States.

 

Best Diet for Heart Disease Prevention?

plant-based diet bestThe study found that in 2016 (the last year for which data were available):

  • Dietary risk factors were responsible for 49.2% of heart disease deaths.
  • 6% of all diet-related heart disease deaths occurred in adults younger than 70, and that percentage has been increasing in recent years.

When they looked at the contribution of individual foods to diet related heart disease deaths, the percentages were:

  • Diets low in whole grains = 20.4%
  • Diets low in nuts and seeds = 16.2%
  • Diets low in fruits = 12.5%
  • Diets high in sodium = 12.0%
  • Diets low in omega-3s = 10.8%
  • strong heartDiets low in vegetables = 9.0%
  • Diets low in legumes = 7.0%
  • Diets low in fiber = 5.7%
  • Diets low in polyunsaturated fats = 3.7%
  • Diets high in processed meats = 1.6%
  • Diets high in trans fatty acids = 0.8%
  • Diets high in sugar-sweetened beverages = 0.1%

So, what is the best diet for heart disease prevention?

In short, this study concluded:

  • A primarily plant-based diet is the best protection against premature death due to heart disease.
  • All plant-based food groups (whole grains, nuts and seeds, fruits, vegetables, and legumes) play an important role in reducing heart disease deaths.
  • Meat was not included in the analysis, but it is likely that most people’s diets in this region of the world contained some meat. The most likely take-away is that meat does not affect heart disease risk in the context of a primarily plant-based diet.
  • Dairy was not included in the analysis either, but some studies suggest dairy, particularly fermented dairy foods, reduce heart disease risk.
  • Finally, the study concluded: “Compared to other…modifiable risk factors (physical inactivity, drug and alcohol abuse, tobacco smoking, obesity, etc.), an altered diet is the most effective means of preventing premature deaths from cardiovascular disease in Western Europe.”

While every study has its weaknesses, this study is consistent with multiple previous studies showing that primarily plant-based diets are best for reducing heart disease risk. You will find a more complete discussion of these studies in my book “Slaying The Food Myths.”

 

Are the American Heart Association’s Recommendations Correct?

With this study’s results in mind we can now ask whether the recommendations of the American Heart Association and other popular diets are correct. Are they likely to reduce heart disease deaths?

  • The American Heart Association Recommends a dietary pattern that emphasizes a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts and legumes, skinless poultry and fish, and low-fat dairy products. This study supports those recommendations.
  • This study also supports the heart-health benefits of the Mediterranean and DASH diets.
  • Meat and dairy were not explicitly considered in this study. Thus, the results of this study are also consistent with vegan and semi-vegetarian diets.
  • However, low carb diets like Paleo and keto eliminate some of the key food groups (whole grains, fruits, and legumes) that appear to be essential for reducing heart disease risk. 40% of the heart-health benefits in this study came from those 3 food groups. Thus, this study does not support claims that those two diets are heart-healthy long term.

 

The Bottom Line

 

Everyone has a magic diet for reducing heart disease risk. The American Heart Association tells us to avoid fats, especially saturated fats. Vegans tell us to avoid animal protein. Paleo and keto enthusiasts tell us carbs are the problem. Who is correct?

A recent study provides some important clues. It looked at dietary patterns associated with reduced risk of premature death from heart disease in Western Europe. The study concluded:

  • A primarily plant-based diet is the best protection against premature death due to heart disease.
  • All plant-based food groups (whole grains, nuts and seeds, fruits, vegetables, and legumes) play an important role in reducing heart disease deaths.
  • Meat did not appear to affect heart disease risk in the context of a primarily plant-based diet.
  • Dairy was not included in the analysis, but some studies suggest dairy, particularly fermented dairy foods, reduce heart disease risk.
  • Finally, the study concluded: “Compared to other…modifiable risk factors (physical inactivity, drug and alcohol abuse, tobacco smoking, obesity, etc.), an altered diet is the most effective means of preventing premature deaths from cardiovascular disease.”

While every study has its weaknesses, this study is consistent with multiple previous studies showing that primarily plant-based diets are best for reducing heart disease risk. You will find a more complete discussion of these studies in my book “Slaying The Food Myths.”

With this study’s results in mind we can now ask whether the recommendations of the American Heart Association and other popular diets are correct. Are they likely to reduce heart disease deaths?

  • The American Heart Association Recommends a dietary pattern that emphasizes a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts and legumes, skinless poultry and fish, and low-fat dairy products. This study supports those recommendations.
  • This study also supports the heart-health benefits of the Mediterranean and DASH diets.
  • Meat and dairy were not explicitly considered in this study. Thus, the results of this study are also consistent with vegan and semi-vegetarian diets.
  • However, low carb diets like Paleo and keto eliminate some of the key food groups (whole grains, fruits, and legumes) that appear to be essential for reducing heart disease risk. 40% of the heart-health benefits in this study came from those 3 food groups. Thus, this study does not support claims that those two diets are heart-healthy long term.

For more details read the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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