Warm Up Before Stretching

Written by Dr. Steve Chaney on . Posted in Stretching

Avoid Muscle Pain Before It Starts

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT –The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

give thanksNovember is the month that reminds us to be grateful for all the blessings we enjoy because we are Americans.  Of course, we should be grateful every day for the freedoms we have in this beautiful country! Have you thought about the freedom you enjoy the most?  For me it’s the freedom to worship however I choose because we don’t have a particular religion forced on us. I also love the fact that I can own my business and move it anywhere I like in the entire country.

I hope you’ll give some thought to what you are grateful for as this happy holiday draws near.

 

Should we warm up before stretching?

 

Avoid Muscle Pain Before It Starts

 

Now that the weather has turned cooler in all parts of the USA, more people are exercising outdoors.  Are you?  Be sure to warm up your muscles before you go running or cycling.  One good way to gently and effectively warm up your joints is to bring them into their full range-of-motion. This is also a great morning routine when you first get up.

warm up before stretching ropeYou have been told to stretch before you exercise. However, stretching while a muscle is tied up with spasms that shorten its fibers may cause the muscle fibers to get micro-tears. You could be creating muscle pain rather than avoiding muscle pain.

As an analogy, think about what happens if you tie a rope in knots and then try to stretch it to its original length without first untying the knots.  That is exactly what happens when you try to stretch a muscle that is tight or has spasms.  Release the spasms by warming up first, and then stretch.  It works great and will assure that you don’t hurt worse after stretching than you did before you stretched.

 

Warm Up Before Stretching

warm up before stretching arms upThe key here is not attempting to stretch your muscles, but to just gently move your joints. Here is a whole-body warm-up procedure I recommend.

warm up before stretching arms outFirst, bring your arm all the way across the front of your body, then slowly help the movement by linking your opposite arm across your elbow and pull your arm toward your chest.  Repeat this with your opposite arm, loosening the back of your shoulders.  Only go to the point of “feels so good,” never to a point of pain.

Then bring both arms as far back as you can, releasing the front of your shoulders.  While you’re there, move your head and neck down toward your chest and around to the side, moving the top of your shoulders and neck.

warm up before stretching stretch backwarm up before stretching legs outNext, with your arms still out to the side, rotate your arms forward several times, and then backwards several times. Your intention is to move your shoulder joint in as many directions as possible, always doing the movement gently and slowly.

Warm up your waist and lower back by keeping your hips still and rotating your upper body as far to the left as you comfortably can, and then as far to the right.  The goal here is to gently move all the joints from your mid-back to your hips.

To loosen your hip joint, you’ll want to easily swing your leg back and forth. If you are standing with your foot on the floor, you’ll need to hold your foot up, so it clears the floor.

When possible, it’s good to be standing on a step or some books so the foot on your swinging leg will be relaxed. Below I am demonstrating by warm up before stretching legsstanding on two packs of copy paper.

warm up before stretching legs backStand with your right leg on a step, and then slowly and gently swing your left leg back and forth.  Let your leg drop, giving an easy stretch to your hip joint.  Then reverse so you can do the same to your right leg & hip.  Then hold on to something and swing your leg in front of you, going from side-to-side.

This entire program will take from 5-10 minutes of your time, and its goal is to just get your joints moving.  It should always feel good, like you are waking up your joints to prepare for the day. There are many good morning routines to loosen up joints that stiffen while sleeping.

After you have released the knots in your muscles, you can stretch safely.  Now you are ready to start your day!

 

How to Untie the Spasms that are Knotting Up Your Muscles

 

inner knee pain free livingIf your muscles have painful knots, this gentle warm-up procedure is not always enough. I also teach people how to untie the knots (spasms) that form in muscles. Those knots shorten the fibers and put a strain on the joints.  I always recommend that you apply direct pressure on the knots, holding the pressure for 30 seconds to press toxins out of the fibers and draw blood into the muscle.

warm up before stretching pain freeIf you have been to see me at my office, you know that I always teach how to do two or three of the Julstro Method self-treatments that will help you stop pain.  I’ve been doing this for years, and it works.

Back in 2001 I wrote my first self-treatment book titled The Pain-Free Triathlete. At the time most of my clients were either serious athletes or Ironman triathletes.  That ultimately expanded to become a book for the general public and in 2010 I wrote Treat Yourself to Pain-Free Living.  Thanks to print-on-demand that book was constantly updated and revised, with the latest version being done in 2018.  Then I wrote the updated book for athletes titled: The Pain-Free Athlete. 

yoga pain relief dvdI also have a DVD stretching program that combines all the self-treatments with a safe Yoga stretching routine.  That DVD program is titled Focused Flexibility Training, although it started out as Trigger Point Yoga (only the name was changed).

warm up before stretching bacl pain solutionThe 15 Minute Back Pain Solution was another book added to the collection. This book focuses on the muscles that specifically cause low back pain, and hip/groin/knee pain, as well as sciatica.  Originally it was only available as a Kindle book, but it is now being printed and will be ready soon.

It’s not difficult to release the tight muscle spasms that are causing you pain, it just takes a bit of direction to know how to find the point and how to treat it.  Each of these books and DVD programs show you how to do that quickly and easily.

You can look at each of these books and programs by going to www.JulstroMethod.com/shop

 

Wishing you well,

 

Julie Donnelly

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

About The Author

julie donnelly

Julie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

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Latest Article

Can Plant-based Diets Be Unhealthy?

Posted September 10, 2019 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Do Plant-Based Diets Reduce Heart Disease Deaths?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

plant-based diets vegetablesPlant-based diets have become the “Golden Boys” of the diet world. They are the diets most often recommended by knowledgeable health and nutrition professionals. I’m not talking about all the “Dr. Strangeloves” who pitch weird diets in books and the internet. I am talking legitimate experts who have spent their life studying the impact of nutrition on our health.

Certainly, there is an overwhelming body of evidence supporting the claim that plant-based diets are healthy. Going on a plant-based diet can help you lower blood pressure, inflammation, cholesterol and triglycerides. People who consume a plant-based diet for a lifetime weigh less and have decreased risk of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

But, can a plant-based diet be unhealthy? Some people consider a plant-based diet to simply be the absence of meat and other animal foods. Is just replacing animal foods with plant-based foods enough to make a diet healthy?

Maybe not. After all, sugar and white flour are plant-based food ingredients. Fake meats of all kinds abound in our grocery stores. Some are very wholesome, but others are little more than vegetarian junk food. If you replace animal foods with plant-based sweets, desserts, and junk food, is your diet really healthier?

While the answer to that question seems obvious, very few studies have asked that question. Most studies on the benefits of plant-based diets have compared population groups that eat a strictly plant-based diet (Seventh-Day Adventists, vegans, or vegetarians) with the general public. They have not looked at variations in plant food consumption within the general public. Nor have they compared people who consume healthy and unhealthy plant foods.

This study (H Kim et al, Journal of the American Heart Association, 8:e012865, 2019) was designed to fill that void.

 

How Was The Study Done?

plant-based diets studyThis study used data collected from 12,168 middle aged adults in the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study between 1987 and 2016.

The participant’s usual intake of foods and beverages was assessed by trained interviewers using a food frequency questionnaire at the time of entry into the study and again 6 years later.

Participants were asked to indicate the frequency with which they consumed 66 foods and beverages of a defined serving size in the previous year. Visual guides were provided to help participants estimate portion sizes.

The participant’s adherence to a plant-based diet was assessed using four different well-established plant-based diet scores. For the sake of simplicity, I will include 3 of them in this review.

  • The PDI (Plant-Based Diet Index) categorizes foods as either plant foods or animal foods. A high PDI score means that the participant’s diet contains more plant foods than animal foods. A low PDI score means the participant’s diet contains more animal foods than plant foods.
  • The hPDI (healthy plant-based diet index) is based on the PDI but emphasizes “healthy” plant foods. A high hPDI score means that the participant’s diet is high in healthy plant foods (whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, coffee and tea) and low in animal foods.
  • The uPDI (unhealthy plant-based diet index) is based on the PDI but emphasizes “unhealthy” plant foods. A high uPDI score means that the participant’s diet is high in unhealthy plant foods (refined grains, fruit juices, French fries and chips, sugar sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages, sweets and desserts) and low in animal foods.

For statistical analysis the scores from the various plant-based diet indices were divided into 5 equal groups. In each case, the group with the highest score consumed the most plant foods and least animal foods. The group with the lowest score consumed the least plant foods and the most animal foods.

The health outcomes measured in this study were heart disease events, heart disease deaths, and all-cause deaths. Again, for the sake of simplicity, I will only include 2 of these outcomes (heart disease deaths and all-cause deaths) in this review. The data on deaths were obtained from state death records and the National Death Index. (Yes, your personal information is available on the web even after you die.)

 

Do Plant-Based Diets Reduce Heart Disease Deaths?

plant-based diets reduce heart deathsThe participants in this study were followed for an average of 25 years.

The investigators looked at heart disease deaths over the 25 years and compared people with the highest intake of plant foods to people with the highest intake of red meat and other animal foods. The results were:

  • People with the highest intake of plant foods and the highest intake of healthy plant foods (whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, coffee and tea) had a 19-32% lower risk of dying from heart disease than people with the highest intake of red meat and other animal foods.
  • People with the highest intake of unhealthy plant foods (refined grains, fruit juices, French fries and chips, sugar sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages, sweets and desserts) had the same risk of dying from heart disease as people with the highest intake of red meat and other animal foods.

When the investigators looked at all-cause deaths over the 25 years:

  • People with the highest intake of plant foods and the highest intake of healthy plant foods had an 11-25% lower risk of dying from any cause than people with the highest intake of red meat and other animal foods.
  • People with the highest intake of unhealthy plant foods had the same risk of dying from heart disease as people with the highest intake of red meat and other animal foods.

What Else Did The Study Show?

The investigators made a couple of other interesting observations:

  • The association of the overall diet with heart disease and all-cause deaths was stronger than the association of individual food components. This underscores the importance of looking at the effect of the whole diet on health outcomes rather than the “magic” foods you hear about on Dr. Strangelove’s Health Blog.
  • Diets with the highest amount of healthy plant foods were associated with higher intake of carbohydrates, plant protein, fiber, and micronutrients, including potassium, magnesium, iron, vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, and lower intake of saturated fat and cholesterol.
  • Diets with the highest amount of unhealthy plant foods were associated with higher intake of calories and carbohydrates and lower intake of fiber and micronutrients.

The last two observations may help explain some of the health benefits of plant-based diets.

 

Can Plant-Based Diets Be Unhealthy?

plant-based diets unhealthy cookiesNow, let’s return to the question I asked at the beginning of this article: “Can plant-based diets be unhealthy?” Although some previous studies have suggested that unhealthy plant-based diets might increase the risk of heart disease, this study did not show that.

What this study did show was that an unhealthy plant-based diet was no better for you than a diet containing lots of red meat and other animal foods.

If this were the only conclusion from this study, it might be considered a neutral result. However, this result clearly contrasts with the data from this study and many others showing that both plant-based diets in general and healthy plant-based diets reduce the risk of heart disease deaths and all-cause deaths compared to animal-based diets.

The main message from this study is clear.

  • Replacing red meat and other animal foods with plant foods can be a healthier choice, but only if they are whole, minimally processed plant foods like whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, coffee and tea.
  • If the plant foods are refined grains, fruit juices, French fries and chips, sugar sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages, sweets and desserts, all bets are off. You may be just as unhealthy as if you kept eating a diet high in red meat and other animal foods.

There is one other subtle message from this study. This study did not compare vegans with the general public. Everyone in the study was the general public. Nobody in the study was consuming a 100% plant-based diet.

For example:

  • The group with the highest intake of plant foods consumed 9 servings per day of plant foods and 3.6 servings per day of animal foods.
  • The group with the lowest intake of plant foods consumed 5.4 servings per day of plant foods and 5.6 servings per day of animal foods.

In other words, you don’t need to be a vegan purist to experience health benefits from adding more whole, minimally processed plant foods to your diet.

 

The Bottom Line

A recent study analyzed the effect of consuming plant foods on heart disease deaths and all-cause deaths over a 25-year period.

When the investigators looked at heart disease deaths over the 25 years:

  • People with the highest intake of plant foods and the highest intake of healthy plant foods had a 19-32% lower risk of dying from heart disease than people with the highest intake of red meat and other animal foods.
  • People with the highest intake of unhealthy plant foods had the same risk of dying from heart disease as people with the highest intake of red meat and other animal foods.

When the investigators looked at all-cause deaths over the 25 years:

  • People with the highest intake of plant foods and the highest intake of healthy plant foods had an 11-25% lower risk of dying from any cause than people with the highest intake of red meat and other animal foods.
  • People with the highest intake of unhealthy plant foods had the same risk of dying from heart disease as people with the highest intake of red meat and other animal foods.

The main message from this study is clear.

  • Replacing red meat and other animal foods with plant foods can be a healthier choice, but only if they are whole, minimally processed plant foods like whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, coffee and tea.
  • If the plant foods are refined grains, fruit juices, French fries and chips, sugar sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages, sweets and desserts, all bets are off. You may be just as unhealthy as if you kept eating a diet high in red meat and other animal foods.

A more subtle message from the study is that you don’t need to be a vegan purist to experience health benefits from adding more whole, minimally processed plant foods to your diet. The people in this study were not following some special diet. The only difference was that some of the people in this study ate more plant foods and others more animal foods.

For more details on the study, read the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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